Possway T3 Review – more range and comfort

Possway has been around for a while and we’ve been ignoring it as long as we could. You see, as new affordable electric skateboard brands from China are dime a dozen, it takes a lot of work for smaller new brands to stand a chance. After all, existing big players have the advantage of mass production for low costs. 

It’s a good thing that Possway fought long enough and now has a board we can’t ignore—the Possway T3.

Possway T3 offers a big 7.8 Ah battery and 105 mm Cloudwheels Donut clones right off the box for $499. The board also has dual 500W hub motors, which is above average for boards under $500. 

So, if the big battery, big motor, and big wheels perform as well as they should on paper, Possway T3 could be one of the top choices for affordable electric skateboards. Let’s go step by step and run through the specs.

Possway T3 Build and Specs

  • Electronic Speed Control: LingYi ESC
  • Deck: 37” inch drop deck, W concave, 1-ply bamboo, 8-ply maple, medium flex
  • Battery: 7.8 Ah, 10s3p
  • Marketed Range: 17 miles / 28 km
  • Motors: 500 W * 2 dual hub
  • Marketed Top Speed: 32 mph or 52 km/h
  • Trucks: Non-branded, 45° Caliber clone
  • Wheels: 105 mm Cloudwheel Donuts clone

Possway T3 uses a 37” drop deck with a nice W-concave to keep your feet comfortable. The deck is made out of 1-ply bamboo and 8-ply maple with a medium flex. Flip it over and you’ll see a dual plastic enclosure housing a LingYi electronic speed controller and the big 7.8 Ah 10s3p configured battery.

This battery adds up to 280.8 watt-hours and has a marketed range of 17 miles or 28 km. We put it to the test and our 210 lbs or 95 kg riders only got 11 miles or 18 km out of riding it at full speed.

As for the trucks, Possway T3 uses non-branded ones that look like a Caliber clone. These are 45-degree trucks that come in tight. The wheels are 105 mm Cloudwheels Donut clones. These wheels are great for absorbing road vibrations.

The dual 500W motors, on the other hand, advertise 32 mph or 52 km/h top speed. Sadly, we only got 28.5 mph or 46 km/h from it.

To know more about dual hub motors, click here.

So, while both the top speed and range are pretty great, they did not rise to the marketing figures. Next, let’s talk about the riding experience.

Riding Experience

Overall, we would describe the riding experience of the Possway T3 as comfortable and relaxing but unexciting. Here are our thoughts on the ‘unexciting’ part. 

The Possway T3 is not powerful and there isn’t much thrill from it. The dual 500W motors looked powerful on paper but were merely decent on the streets. 

The accelerations are pretty meek and for heavy riders, it might struggle on uphill roads. Still, the board is gentle and relaxing to ride. The LingYi ESC on this Possway T3 is perfectly smooth and intuitive in all 4 accelerations and brake modes.

Similar to the speed control, the board is equally comfortable and relaxing to maneuver. 

The deck of the T3 is definitely the highlight of the board. Its drop-down design allows great stability with a lower riding height. Although, the low ground clearance might limit your choices for ride locations. 

To check out other boards under $500, click here.

The concave of the deck was also a huge help for controlling the board better. The deck is wider at both ends which allows better foot placement. This is perfect for those with large shoe sizes.

The trucks also add to the stable and relaxing nature of the Possway T3. These trucks are geared towards stability over responsiveness. The Possway T3 will feel very stable and relaxing even at top speed.

Another strong point for the T3 would be its ride comfort on rough pavements. The 105 mm wheels combined with a flexible deck made the T3 one of the more comfortable boards for excruciatingly poor road conditions. 

To check out our review on Cloudwheel Donuts, click here.

The VERDICT

All in all, the nice numbers on paper only told us little about the Possway T3. In fact, the dual hub motors with big wattage don’t give the equivalent power it should. This has to be the biggest weakness of the board.

However, Possway T3 did a lot of things better than its competition. Namely, better range, bigger 105 mm wheels for those who prefer it, and a pretty nice deck and truck combination for a relaxing, stable, and comfortable ride. 

Even though the board did not perform up to our initial expectation (which was very high), the Possway T3 is still objectively a good board providing good value for money. 

Beginners will appreciate it for maximizing ride comfort and stability. It’s also a great choice for eskate commuters who want more range and stability on poorly paved roads. 

Nice one, Possway. We’ll keep tabs on the next one.

If you are interested in buying the Possway, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ” to receive 5% off during check out.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and help us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

Tynee Board Classic Review – ‘safest choice’ under $500?

There are a lot of options for budget electric skateboards for less than $500. You’ll be spoiled with different combinations of specs, and it’ll be up to you which eskates match your style. The top pick at this time would no doubt be the WowGo 2s Max and the Meepo V4, but we’re not at the finish line yet. Say hello to the Tynee Board Classic, competing for the third spot. And who knows, for some rider it might even be THE board to get.

How good is the Tynee Board Classic? Well, spoiler alert, we think it is the boring safe choice for anyone looking for a comfortable budget electric skateboard. It also embodies the current standard for entry-level electric skateboards. First, let’s go through the specs.

Build and Specs

  • Tynee Board Classic Review
  • ESC: 10s Hobbywing ESC with smart power-on
  • Batteries: 5 Ah – 10s2p Samsung 25R; 8.7 Ah – 10s3p DMEGC 29E cell
  • Marketed range: 5 Ah – 12 miles or 19 km; 8.7 Ah – 22 miles or 35 km
  • Motors: 350W Hobbywing
  • Marketed top speed: 23 mph or 38 kph
  • Trucks: Tynee PE Trucks; upgraded from Paris V3
  • Wheels: 90mm street wheels; Cloudwheel Donuts compatible

Let’s begin with the electronic speed controller. Tynee Board Classic uses 10s Hobbywing ESC with smart power-on. For those who don’t know, Hobbywing ESC is now the most common choice and safe choice for speed control. It has always provided smooth and intuitive speed control.

As for the battery, there are two options. The Tynee Board Classic at $449 uses a 5 Ah Samsung 25R. This is a fairly common and good choice. The battery configuration is 10s2p, meaning it has a 180wh pack. Pull up the bubble chart, and you can see that 180wh is the median battery size you can expect from a sub-$500 board. 

Good Deal for DMEGC 313wh Battery Pack

Tynee Board Classic Review

The other option at $509 is a bigger 313wh pack, configured at 10s3p with DMEGC 29E cell. While DMEGC cells are not well-known, a 313wh battery pack for $500 is a good deal.

The review unit we received at the headquarters is the 5AH Tynee Board Classic. This version has a marketed range of 12 miles or 19 km. When we tested it out, our 210lbs/95kg test rider managed to get 7.5 miles or 12 km out of it. 

Both the marketed range and the tested range are typical for electric skateboards under $500. We weren’t able to test out the 8.7AH version, but it has a marketed range of 22 miles or 35 km.

To check out our review on the Tynee Board Mini, click here.

Cloudwheels Donut Compatible

Tynee Board Classic Review

Next, let’s talk about the motors. The Tynee Board Classic uses a set of 350W motors from Hobbywing. These are pretty average motors for this price range. The top speed is 23mph or 38km/h, which is again, typical.

As for the wheels, Tynee Board Classic has an option for 90mm street wheels and is also compatible with Cloudwheel Donuts. 

The deck uses authentic Canadian maple with medium flex and mild concave. This is great news for those who enjoy a flexible deck for its smoother ride and better carving feel. Major competitors in the sub-$500 category chose stiffer decks.

Tynee Board Classic Review

Now, let’s go to the trucks. The Tynee Board Classic uses its proprietary Tynee PE trucks. From our previous reviews, these trucks have been fairly decent and consistent with stability. The Tynee PE trucks are also upgraded from the Paris V3.

The $449 and $509 versions of Tynee Board Classic weigh 15.4 lbs or 7.0 kg and are rated to be IP54 waterproof. Again, a waterproof rating doesn’t mean much in the electric skateboarding world. Perhaps the Tynee Classic is a tad bit more waterproof than its competitors, but we would never recommend riding the board when it’s wet outside.

Classic Specs for a Classic Ride

At this point, you might notice that the Tynee Board Classic has simply gone with what’s known to work. Besides offering an 8.7 Ah version, which is a great value for the price, both the motor and ESC are just typical choices that are common for the board’s price.

What sets Tynee Board Classic from its competitors would be its choice of electronic parts. We bet seasoned eskaters can already imagine what kind of ride profile the board has just by going through the specs on paper.

To check out our review on the Tynee Board Ultra, click here.

Riding Experience

Tynee Board Classic Review

Unsurprisingly, the Tynee Board Classic has super smooth acceleration and brakes thanks to Hobbywing ESC. Both acceleration and brakes are nice and strong. The 350W hub motors are quiet and competent. Although they are not the most powerful or thrilling motors, inclines are handled pretty well. 

The board is quite nice for carving. The Tynee PE trucks, while inferior to branded premium trucks in responsiveness, are still nice and responsive with a good return to center. The trucks provide a stable ride even when going at full speed. I think most casual or beginner riders would appreciate Tynee going with a stable truck that allows an easy and relaxing ride.

What the Tynee Board Classic is bad at would be what all dual-hub boards are bad at—fighting road vibrations on rough pavements. Still, the Tynee Board Classic does a better job at it than most other dual hub boards thanks to the flexible deck. The flexible deck absorbs part of the shock, but it’s still very uncomfortable and will convince you to spend on Cloudwheel Donuts.

To check out our review on Cloudwheel Donuts, click here.

THE VERDICT

  • Tynee Board Classic Review

All in all, the Tynee Board Classic has competitive specs, adequate power, smooth acceleration, and stable rides, but is not exactly the most exciting board in town. It is, however, an affordable, comfortable, and competent electric longboard that suits someone who just wants a relaxing ride. 

While the same praise could be sung louder for its competitor, WowGo 2s Max AKA our pick for the best budget electric skateboard at the moment, Tynee Board Classic offers a different ride taste with a flexible deck instead of WowGo’s stiff deck. Another flex the Tynee Board Classic has would be its bigger battery if you choose the 8.7 AH version.

If you’re the type to prefer a classic approach on eskate parts that have worked throughout the years, then the Tynee Board Classic is definitely a good choice for a good price.

RIDE SAFE, GUYS.

For more reviews, news, and discussions on electric skateboards, visit Electric Skateboard HQ!

Meepo Hurricane Review – Great board, where does it stands?

Meepo Board is traditionally known to make powerful boards at the best “price-performance” ratio. The brand is always your go-to choice for eskates in the sub-$500 segment. Although, they’re having less recognition for higher-priced boards. Meepo Board changes the game in 2021 with Meepo Hurricane. This $1699 board has been overwhelmingly popular in the eskate community. So, what sets this all-terrain carbon fiber board apart from its peers? How is it different from other 2-in-1 boards that use the Evolve formula? Let’s find out.

Build and specs of Meepo Hurricane

  • Deck: T700 carbon fiber, double-drop, wide concave, stiff deck, top-access electronic compartment
  • ESC: LingYi FOC ESC 70 Belt, 4-speed modes, push-to-start feature
  • Marketed Top Speed: 35mph or 56km/h
  • Motors: 3500 W * 2
  • Batteries: 12s4p Molicel P42A
  • Marketed Range: 31miles or 50km
  • Trucks: Double Kingpin Truck
  • Wheels: 155mm pneumatic wheels; 90mm street wheels
  • Board Weight: 34 lbs or 15.4 kg
  • Warranty: 1-year guarantee

Meepo Hurricane uses a T700 Carbon Fiber double-drop deck with a built-in, top-access electronic compartment. We didn’t really know what T700 carbon fiber is until we were researching for this review and apparently, it’s commonly used in drone cameras. This type of carbon fiber reduces the probability of cracks.

The deck is also wide and has a full concave. There’s no flex on the board. The carbon fiber is stiff and it’s designed with wave lines that look sleek yet adds a military theme.

Top-access electronic compartment

Inside the carbon fiber deck, you’ll find a giant battery with a 12s4p configuration using Molicel P42A. This is considered a great cell in the market. It adds up to 725.8 watt-hours, which is the third biggest battery pack you can find on any 2-in-1 board. In terms of specs, it’s behind by only a few watts than the Ownboard Zeus’s 13s4p 899wh and Eovan GTS Carbon’s 12s4p 852Wh pack. Okay maybe not ‘a few’, but you get the point.

Big bubble (high top speed) third highest on the chart

This 725.8wh battery pack gave Meepo a marketed range of 31miles or 50km on all-terrain wheels, and 44 miles or 70km range on street wheels.

Our 210lbs or 95kg test rider put the numbers to the test and got 18.5miles or 30km out of the AT set up. With street wheels, we got 31 miles or 50km. 

In our range test, we tried as much as possible to ride. You could probably get the higher advertised range with lighter weight or by riding conservatively.

Electronic Speed control – Hello again, LingYi ESC

For the electronic speed controller, Meepo uses their usual LingYi ESC and they got the latest and greatest version, as always. Hurricane is installed with LingYi FOC 70 Belt with a push-to-start feature. It has 4-speed modes and 4 brake modes that can be set independently of each other. 

Meepo Hurricane also uses Double Kingpin Trucks. In the riding experience, we’ll see if these trucks blend well with 155mm pneumatic wheels. Purchasing Meepo Hurricane also comes with 90mm street wheels if it matches your preferences better. You can also swap these wheels for other semi-AT wheels like Cloudwheels or Meepo’s 110mm Cyclone wheels.

To check out our Meepo NLS Belt Review, click here.

Dual Belt drive – 3500W belt motor

Powering these wheels is a set of 3500W belt motors. Motor wattage means little at this price range, but just for those who are interested, these numbers are the highest out of all belt-driven boards in our database.

With these motors, the Meepo Hurricane has a top speed of 35mph or 56km/h and we managed to only hit 31mph or 50km/h. Although the 35mph was not met, 31mph is still very fast.

The board weighs in at 34 lbs or 15.4 kg and comes with a 1-year warranty.

As you can see, Meepo does what they do best with the Meepo Hurricane – offering beefy specs for its asking price. What’s unexpected for me is how well built and well polished the board is. 

If Meepo Hurricane is the first Meepo, you might have no idea that the company has its roots as an affordable brand. While looks can be subjective, I think everyone will agree that this is the best-looking Meepo ever seen.

Riding experience of Meepo Hurricane

Now, let’s move off the specs on paper and onto the road.

The highlight of the Meepo Hurricane is its power. Meepo loves injecting loads of power into their boards and that’s definitely what happened here.

Out of all 2-in-1 boards in the market, the Meepo Hurricane ranks high on the list, beating any other board that isn’t a 4-wheel drive. 

Power: Meepo Hurricane VS Exway Atlas

Meepo Hurricane and Exway Atlas

Comparing its acceleration or power against Exway Atlas, Meepo Hurricane is way stronger than the 2-wheel drive version of Atlas and almost as strong as Atlas’ 4-wheel drive.

However, the Atlas 4-wheel drive has better torque than Hurricane and can start from a complete stop even on thick grass. Hurricane struggles with this acceleration feature. The 4-wheel drive Exway Atlas also has more grip in offroading and when going up very steep hills, more so when the roads are slippery.

LingYi catches up with Hobbywing ESC

With all that power on the board, it’s no surprise that the Meepo Hurricane also has good speed control. We can finally say that the control smoothness of the latest LingYi ESC is now indistinguishable from the gold-standard set by Hobbywing ESC. 

Meepo Hurricane has 4-speed modes, and all are smooth and intuitive. Mode 1 and 2 are tame, probably intended for casual riding, while mode 3 and mode 4 are thrillingly powerful. Having 4 different modes for braking also allows you to choose between gentler braking to having a very strong brake on the 4th brake mode. Those who love strong brakes would be really happy with the brakes here. 

To check out our Meepo V4 Review, click here.

Double Kingpin trucks geared towards stability

Meepo clearly wants Hurricane to be ridden fast, as even the double kingpin truck on Hurricane is geared towards stability rather than for fun carving. The trucks are not the most agile and the board remains comfortably stable at high speed. 

However, this also means that the Hurricane is not your best option for carving. Stiff deck, big wheels, and tight trucks are all minus points for fun carving, and we don’t feel much temptation to carve around when we are on the Hurricane. 

This is in contrast to the Exway Atlas, which is geared towards responsive trucks that are more fun to carve with, but less stable at high speed.

Built for speed and stability

Meepo Hurricane riding shots

Besides the trucks, the rest of Hurricane’s built speaks stability, too. The carbon fiber deck is wide and has a nice concave to it. It feels nice and stable underneath the feet. The double-drop deck also allows a low to ground ride feel, further adding to the stability. Stiff decks don’t bounce, which is yet another point for a stable high-speed ride. 

With all that said, designing a board this way has a few trade-offs. For starters, a low ride height also means low ground clearance, and your beautiful carbon fiber deck is just one tall bumper away from becoming less beautiful. 

The stiff deck and relatively smaller 155mm pneumatic wheels mean going off-road on gravel, and small rocks aren’t as comfortable as other 2-in-1 boards with bigger wheels and flexible decks.

Going with street wheels further exacerbates both of these problems, where the board bottoms out on each bumper and becomes unbearable when riding on poorly paved roads. 

Meepo Hurricane with 90mm wheels

To avoid feeling every small crack and bump, we would recommend skipping the 90mm street and going for semi-AT wheels like the 105mm cloud wheels, or anything bigger. The safest bet is to stick to the AT set-up.

THE VERDICT- Should you buy Meepo Hurricane?

You see, it has been more than half a year since the initial launch of the Meepo Hurricane and even as the hype cooled, the board remains wildly popular. We think all this love is well-deserved, as Meepo Hurricane not only hit it out of the park when it comes to delivering maximum value for the price, it also has an amazing look and amazing polish to go with it. 

Meepo Hurricane

While the similarly priced Exway Atlas 2-wheel-drive is a better carving board and has some fun features such as having a smartphone app, Meepo Hurricane has a much better range and better power. So, whether you are looking for an all-terrain board that speaks power and stability, or simply want a polished AT board that tops the competition with specs, Meepo Hurricane is the board for you. Do look elsewhere, if you want a board that has maximum carving fun, or looking to do hardcore off-roading.

RIDE SAFE, GUYS!

If you are interested in buying the Meepo, be sure to check out our affiliate link here.
You’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

Wowgo 2S Max Review – The best budget electric skateboard.

Not too long ago, we crowned the Wowgo 2S Pro as the best budget electric skateboard under $500. So imagine our surprise that just after 7 months, Wowgo find the need to one-up themselves and released Wowgo 2S Max as an update for the 2s Pro.

From Wowgo 2s Pro to 2s Max:

The obvious key changes are

  1. slight upgrade in motor wattage (500W -> 550W) and top speed (25mph ->28mph),
  2. giving the option of 105mm Honeycomb wheels for an extra $120.
  3. update in ESC

Unfortunately, the improvement doesn’t come free, as the $479 Wowgo 2S Max also saw a small price bump from $429 of the 2S Pro to $479.99 for the 2S Max. While it is a pretty foregone conclusion that the 2S Max will inherit the throne of being the best budget electric skateboard, we will have to examine if there is any flaw to the package.

As usual, let’s run through the specs to be clear about those theoretical upgrades…

Build and specs – Wowgo 2s Max

  • Deck: Canadian Maple, bamboo, and fiberglass; subtle concave with no camber/rocker
  • ESC: Hobbywing ESC; 4-speed modes, smart power-on
  • Marketed Top Speed: 28 mph / 45 kph
  • Motors: 550 W * 2 hub motors
  • Batteries: 12s2p, 5.0Ah, 50.4V
  • Marketed Range: 14.3 miles / 23 km (90mm wheels)
  • Trucks: Poseidon Trucks
  • Wheels: 90mm street wheels / 105mm honeycomb wheels
  • Board Weight: 18lbs / 8.2kg

Design & Deck – Wowgo 2s Max

The WowGo 2S Max’s deck is a combination of Canadian Maple, bamboo, and fiberglass. It only has a mild flex to it, and it’s even slightly stiffer than the 2S Pro. It also has a wide but subtle concave and is flat without any camber or rocker. As an upgrade, Wowgo put on a foam grip tape to improve vibration absorption for the 2S Max. However, this made the concave of the deck less prominent and our feet felt less secure during carving and rides.

The design on the grip tapes and the backside of the deck is pretty nice, too. The trident graphic gets to stay, and there’s another option of a new black design which looks pretty cool as well.

Trident underneath the deck (photo of 2s Pro)

For the electronic speed controller, the WowGo 2S Max used the 12s Hobbywing ESC which received minor updates from the one on 2S Pro. It also has the smart power-on feature, of course. 

Hobbywing ESC Turbo

It is a given that speed control with the 12s Hobbywing ESC is going to be strong, silky smooth, and intuitive, but we are still looking to see if the “minor update” did anything to improve on that.

There are 4-speed modes, with the highest speed mode named Turbo. 

And per usual, it uses the elegant remote that comes with telemetry. 

Now, let’s look at the trucks. These are the same Poseidon trucks that Wowgo developed for the Wowgo 2S Pro. The trucks look to be Caliber II clones, are 8- inches 50° with 85 A bushing. From our previous review, we know it is a truck that prioritizes stability over maneuverability. 

To check out our Wowgo 2S Pro review, click here.

Wowgo 2s Max have one of the strongest hubs

As for the motors, the 2S Max received a 50W boost per motor and now uses 550W dual hub motors. Judging by the numbers on paper, 550W motors will be amongst the strongest hub motors of all entry-level hub boards, with only the Meepo V4 Shuffle beating it at 620W x 2. To give you more context, most entry-level eskates use 400-450W hubs.

As a result, this 550W gave an improved marketed top speed of 28 mph (45 kph) and it did exactly that on our top-speed test.

There are also 105mm hub-sleeves and semi-all terrain wheels available. We will talk about how they perform later.

For the standard wheels, WowGo 2S Max is using 78A soft PU wheels, which is pretty usual for entry-level boards. 

And when it comes to power, Wowgo 2S Max uses a 12S2P 5.0 AH battery. This gave a battery pack of 216wh in size and had a marketed range of 14.3miles (23km).

With regular street wheels, our 200lbs (90kg) test rider managed to get only 10miles(16km).
With the 105mm honeycomb wheels installed, our test rider got 8.6miles (14km) out of a full charge.

The range is exactly the same as what we get from the previous Wowgo 2S Pro which has very similar battery stats at 5.2AH. Although Wowgo kind of overstated the range, 10miles is the usual range for boards below $500, so we weren’t exactly disappointed or surprised here.

Battery size vs price, you can see that everybody <$500 has a similar battery size.
(Bubble size = motor wattage, bigger is more powerful)

The board weighed in at 18 lbs (8.2kg) and comes with a 6-month warranty.

Riding Experience of Wowgo 2s Max

Now that we know the build and specs, it’s time to ride!

First, let’s talk about speed control. Wowgo 2S Max’s speed and speed control are perfect as expected of the 12s Hobbywing ESC. Both acceleration and braking of the 2S Max are buttery smooth and intuitive. The brake strength is very strong, even stronger than the previous 2S Pro. This is great news as most riders eventually learn to love and prefer strong brakes, especially when the brakes are smooth and intuitive like they always are with Hobbywing ESC.

To know more about electronic speed controllers (ESCs), click here.

Powerful Even With Semi-AT Wheels

When it comes to the torque, the 550W hub motors perform incredibly well. By using one of the strongest hub motors amongst the entry-level hub boards, Wowgo 2S Max is powerful enough for any hills on your path. Although the torque and thrill are still a step behind what a set of powerful belt motors could offer, the Wowgo 2S Max is still one of the strongest hub boards amongst all the entry-level boards we’ve tested.

Having a powerful motor is important especially when you plan to put on the bigger 105mm wheels. With the semi-AT wheels, torque, and braking from Wowgo 2s Max goes from quite strong to just “strong”. A board with lesser power would have a ride feel of “no power” at all if installed with semi-AT wheels.

Stability over responsiveness

When it comes to maneuvering the board, it was, unsurprisingly, the same as it was with the older 2S Pro. Carving is fairly fun but more on the tight side, as the Poseidon trucks prioritized stability over maneuverability. The board has a good return to center and feels very stable at high speed.

Honeycomb Wheels Reduces Around 20% of Road Vibrations

The honeycomb wheels are alright, too. On smooth roads, it’s less fun to carve with the 105mm honeycomb wheels as it takes away the silky smoothness of soft urethane wheels. On rough pavement, however, the honeycomb wheels definitely had an impact in reducing vibration at around 20%, in our opinion. This, plus the foam grip tape makes Wowgo 2S Max a good board for those who have the unfortunate fate of living where roads are terrible.

However, if we were to compare these Honeycomb wheels with the Cloudwheels Donut, we would prefer the Donuts over this ‘Cloudwheel-clone’, as Donuts are better in vibration dampening.

The VERDICT – Wowgo 2s Max

So, the verdict seems like the brand with the funny name has done it again. Wowgo is going to retain its throne three times in a row for making the best affordable electric skateboard (first, the Wowgo Knight, then the 2S Pro, now 2s Max.)

Wowgo 2S Max has the performance that either matched or outmatched its competitors, the ride feels that leads the affordable segment and the polish that is much beyond the asking price. 

Simply put, for any rider who wants an entry-level affordable hub board, Wowgo 2S Max (for now) should be the first consideration.

If you are interested in buying the Wowgo, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ” to receive 5% off during check out.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and help us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

Tynee Board Mini (Belt) Review—not so tiny in power!

In this review, we will be looking at the belt-driven shortboard from Tynee Board which was “creatively” named the Tynee Board Mini. We have been reviewing a lot of Tynee Boards recently, but this one, we were told, was special. According to the company themselves, Tynee Board Mini is one of the hottest selling boards from the brand’s line-up. At first glance, it’s not hard to tell why.

Tynee Board Mini is a $579 10s2p belt-driven electric shortboard that has also copied its look from the late Boosted Mini. There is a 10s3p 8.7AH version available for $629, too. The belt-driven mid-tier electric skateboard is a niche that doesn’t have much competition, so it’s not surprising that the board is selling well if it’s decent. So is it?

Tynee Board Mini photo

As usual, let’s take a deeper look at its build and specs.

Build and specs – Tynee Board Mini

  • Deck: stiff maple; flat camber and rocker; wide concave
  • ESC: 12s Hobbywing ESC; 4 speed modes; smart power-on
  • Batteries: $579 version – 5.0 AH 180 wh Samsung; $629 version – 8.7 AH 313 wh
  • Marketed range: $579 version – 12 miles / 19 km; $629 version – 22 miles / 35 km
  • Motors: 5250 Hobbywing Belt
  • Marketed Top Speed: 24 mph or 38 km/h
  • Trucks: Tynee Proprietary Reverse KingPin Trucks (Paris V3 clones)
  • Wheels: 90 mm x 62 MM street wheels, 78 A durometer
  • Weight: 15.2 lbs / 6.9 kg
  • Lights: Headlights and Taillights

Tynee Board Mini uses a wide concave deck similar to the Boosted Mini. It’s stiff and is made of maple.

As for the electronic speed controller, Tynee Board Mini uses a 12s Hobbywing ESC with 4-speed modes and smart power-on. Any eskate veteran should already know the Hobbywing ESC demonstrates a perfectly smooth and intuitive control.

Two battery options for $579 and $629 version

Moving on to the batteries, there are 2 options available: $579 for 5.0 AH 180 wh a Samsung battery or $629 for 8.7 AH 313 wh a long-range battery. The marketed range for the 5 AH version is 12 miles or 19 km. For the 8.7AH version, the marketed range is 22 miles or 35 km.

We got the $579 version, so with the 5.0 AH Samsung battery, our 95kg rider got 12 miles or 19 km. That’s pretty solid. 

It’s a pretty good range for a belt-driven sub-$600 board, but confusing at the same time. The Wowgo Mini 2 which runs on dual hub drives gave us the same range. Hub drives are supposed to be more battery efficient than belt-driven motors. Even Tynee Mini’s nearest competitor, Ownboard M1, only has a marketed range of 7.5 miles or 12 km for $569. Some sorcery, this is. 

Tynee Board Mini is also using Hobbywing 5250 belt motors with a top speed of 24 mph or 38 km/h. The wheels on this board are 90 mm x 62 MM street wheels with a 78 A durometer. 

Tynee proprietary reverse kingpin trucks for stability

Tynee Board Mini photo

As for the trucks, Tynee Board Mini uses their proprietary Reverse Kingpin trucks which are based on the upgraded Paris V3. We reviewed this way back from Tynee Board Ultra and know it’s geared towards stability—a little bit more on it later.

To read our review on Tynee Board Ultra, click here.

This shortie weighs 15.2 lbs or 6.9 kg which is pretty average and easy to carry around.

Now that we know the build and specs of Tynee Board Mini, it’s time to ride!

Riding experience of Tynee Board Mini

Tynee Board Mini with Shredlights photo

As we have mentioned, the acceleration and smoothness of a Hobbywing ESC are always expected. While it is a pretty smooth ride, this shortie can also punch. Power on a belt-driven shortboard is what shines the most for Tynee Board Mini. 

Not so tiny in power

The current gold standard for mid-tier shortboards that every shortboard should be compared to is, for now, the Wowgo Mini 2. In a few reviews back, we commented that the Wowgo Mini 2 has a pretty darn strong acceleration. Well, the Tynee Board Mini is stronger than that just by the virtue of being a belt-driven board. The brake is also strong and very smooth. 

When it comes to maneuvering the board, it is just okay. It’s less fun to carve compared to Wowgo Mini 2 and Exway Wave, but it’s considerably stable at all speed controls. 

You would expect a shortboard with the name “Tiny” and Mini to be the most agile boards amongst all shortboards. Sadly, this is not the case. Tynee Boards are amongst the less carvy boards as compared to Wowgo Mini 2 and Exway Wave.

To read our review on Wowgo Mini 2, click here.

Tynee’s proprietary trucks, although based on Paris V3, are biased towards stability. As a result, it doesn’t feel as nimble as most shortboards. This is not a bad thing, though. Being more stable than carvy is better for the Tynee Mini since it packs a bigger punch than most shortboards.

Stability over maneuverability

Tynee Board Mini photo

A lack of carving quality is also not a problem when it comes to shortboards with a kicktail. Yep, this shortboard has a kicktail and even highlighted it as “sexy kicktail” (what is that supposed to mean lol). 

However, the kicktail is not the easiest to use. It’s just too short to be easily engaged. On the flip side, this ‘design flaw’ might actually be a plus for more inexperienced riders. After all, the shorter kicktail was a tradeoff made to maximize its wheelbase for maximizing stability. A harder-to-engage kicktail also means fewer chances of an accidental wheelie. 

Another downside of the Tynee Mini is its vibration handling ability, which is the flaw of all shortboards. Unlike longboards that have long flexible decks to absorb some of the road vibrations, shortboards are generally harsher when riding through rough pavements. 

Tynee Board Mini wasn’t an exception to this problem, but being a belt-driven board that has 4 real wheels does mean that it’s still a tad bit better than every hub-driven shortboard in this department.

To put this all together, this is how Tynee Mini rides.

For $579, Tynee Board Mini gives you power and stability unmatched by its peers. This also means that it’s less nimble and despite the light 15.2lbs (6.9 kg) weight, the shortboard still feels heavy under the feet. The kicktail is not the easiest to use, but beginners might see this as a feature more than a bug.

THE VERDICT – Tynee Board Mini (Belt)

Tynee Board Mini photo

So, is the Tynee Board Mini the best shortboard out there?

Tynee Board Mini with belt motors can be an easy recommendation for anyone who is looking for a belt-driven shortboard. Whether you are a heavier rider looking for a shortboard that packs torques, or someone who just couldn’t stand the ride feel of hub-motors, Tynee Board Mini Belt should be your best option. Not only because it provides a lot of value for the price, but also because there really are no other options for this price.

RIDE SAFE, GUYS.

If you are interested in buying the Tyneeboard, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ” to receive $10 off during check out.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and help us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!