Tynee Mini 2 Review – Champion of All Mini Boards?!

Everyone appreciates a healthy bit of rivalry between tech companies. When these companies compete with each other by making a better product, the side that benefits the most is us consumers.

A classic example of this in the e-skate industry would be the rivalry between Tynee Mini and Exway Wave. That’s why when Tynee announced the release of their mini-board’s newest version, we just can’t wait to get our hands on it. Here’s our Tynee Mini 2 review!

Tynee Mini 2 Build and Specs

  • Electronic Speed Controller: 12s Hobbywing ESC
  • Deck: genuine Canadian maple, wide concave with kicktail
  • Battery: Molicel 6.0 AH 216 Wh or Molicel 10.1 AH 363 Wh
  • Marketed Range: 14 miles or 22 km; 25 miles or 40km
  • Motors: 2x550W hub motors or 2x850W belt-driven motors
  • Marketed Top Speed: 30 miles or 48 km per hour
  • Trucks: Tynee PE upgraded on Paris V3, 7 inches, 43°
  • Wheels: 90 mm PU wheels or 105 mm Cloudwheels

On paper, the Tynee Mini 2 is impressive. The mini board uses a deck made of genuine Canadian maple with a concave similar to the previous Mini model, Boosted Mini, and Meepo Mini 2. 

During our test, the wide concave of the board greatly helped riders experience a stable and comfortable ride. The leg placement on the deck is very natural and secure. Slipping won’t be an issue. The Tynee Mini 2’s deck is also stiff and does not have any flex to it just like all mini boards in the market. 

As for the electronic speed controller, the Mini 2 uses a 12s Hobbywing ESC with 4-speed modes and a smart power-on feature. For those who don’t know yet, Hobbywing ESC is the gold standard for a buttery smooth and precise board control. 

Two options of Molicel batteries for power

Now, let’s move on to the board’s power source. There are two options available for the Mini 2. The first is the Molicel 6.0 AH 216 Wh battery with a marketed range of 14 miles or 22 km. For more range, there’s an option of a Molicel 10.1 AH 363 Wh battery with a marketed range of 25 miles or 40km.

We got the second version, and the range test only hit 12.4 miles or 20 km with our 216 lbs or 98 kg rider at speed mode 4. For most viewers out there weighing around 154 lbs or 70 kg, you can expect 22 miles or 35 km of range at speed mode 4.

While the Tynee Mini 2 didn’t reach the marketed range in our test, it is important to note that this board uses Molicel which is one of the best cells for electric skateboards. Tynee Mini 2 sells at 629 USD for the smaller battery version, and 769 USD for the bigger one.

This gives the Tynee Mini 2 a huge advantage over the Exway Wave Riot which only has a marketed range of 12.4 miles or 20 km on the standard battery. Although, keep in mind that the Wave Riot’s battery can be easily swapped out to keep the board nimble and sleek.

To read our Exway Wave Review, click here.

Hub and belt-driven motors

The Tynee Mini 2 gives two options for the motors as well. You can either opt for the 2x550W hub motors or the 2x850W belt-driven motors which is the one we used for our test rides. 

We highly recommend the 2x850W belt-driven motor version if comfort is a priority on your checklist. These motors are paired with stock 90 mm wheels with a marketed speed of 30 miles or 48 km per hour. 

For a mini-board, this is a bit overkill but those who love to go fast certainly wouldn’t mind. In our test, the rider did manage to get a top speed of 28 miles or 45 km per hour. Pushing it to the max speed can be a bit risky, though.

Tynee PE trucks are here to stay

Tynee Mini 2 PE Trucks

As for the trucks, Tynee Mini 2 keeps its proprietary Reverse KingPin trucks from the previous model which are based on the upgraded Paris V3. After seeing these trucks on three different models, we can safely say that these are geared towards stability but at the same time can carve pretty well. 

Finally, the new board comes with built-in brake lights and a kick tail for kick turns.”. It’s also nice that the Tynee Mini 2 has an IPX6 water-resistant rating but as we all know, we shouldn’t trust that too much. 

To read our Tynee Board Classic Review, click here.

Tynee Mini 2 Riding Experience

Tynee Mini 2 Kicktail

Now that we’ve covered the specs and numbers, it’s time to ride!

The headliner for the Tynee Mini 2 is definitely its acceleration. For a lot of people, whenever a mini-board is mentioned, speed and acceleration are rarely the biggest concern. Mini boards are, well, mini, and aren’t designed for high speed.

The deciding factor for most people is its portability and how easy it is to travel or commute with these mini boards. However, Tynee is breaking this tradition and mindset with the Tynee Mini 2. The acceleration on this board is buttery smooth and intuitive thanks to the 12s Hobbywing ESC and the belt-driven system. 

Ridiculous top speed for a mini board

The ridiculous marketed max speed of 30 miles or 48km per hour breaks the norm that a mini-board shouldn’t go fast. Testing it out went pretty well due to its power, concave maple deck, and longer wheelbase. This build formula is able to handle things well at higher speeds. 

Tynee Mini 2 is stable at 22 miles or 35 km per hour and if you’re feeling a little brave, you can go for 28 miles or 45 km per hour. 

Well, the speed and acceleration are highly appreciated and very welcome, since the Tynee Mini 2 is equipped with a powerful and smooth braking system.

To read our Tynee Board Ultra Review, click here.

Tynee PE trucks are geared towards stability

The carving experience on the Mini 2 is also decent as it feels fun to carve but falls behind the Trist Trucks of Exway Wave, a board that’s more nimble and agile. 

While the Mini 2 does have a kicktail, it does not live up to its full potential due to the heavy battery at the bottom part of the deck. These made the kicktail dependent on strength but if you give it some practice, you can make it work. 

Another thing that the Tynee Mini 2 can work out is the ride experience on rough roads. In general, mini boards are bad for rough roads due to their stiff and short design. Fortunately, Tynee Mini 2 is a little forgiving, thanks to the belt-driven system. You’ll still feel the vibrations, though.

Tynee Mini 2 VERDICT – not so mini in stability and top speed

Tynee Mini 2 is a high-performance mini-board that gives a huge amount of power and range. We are happy that Tynee updated their Mini version for better performance. The price is absolutely reasonable with its killer specs and value. It is, in our opinion, the most powerful mini electric skateboard at this price point. 

Tynee Mini 2 also rides like a champ, breaking the record for the most stable mini-board to ride at high speed. If you compare it to the WowGo Mini 2 and Exway Wave, Tynee Mini 2 is less nimble and carve-y. It is also quite hefty and bulky due to the bigger batteries and its double enclosures.  

All things said, if speed and range are everything to you and are not particularly concerned about premium polish and features, like a swappable battery, then this is definitely the mini-board for you. 

If you are interested in buying the Tynee, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ” to receive 5% off during check out.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and help us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

If you liked this Tynee Mini 2 Review, check out our other articles at Electric Skateboard HQ! RIDE SAFE, GUYS.

Wowgo Mini 2 Review— Probably the best shortboard right now

In the world of electric skateboards, shortboard lovers often get the short ends of the stick as most eskate brands spend most of their R&D resources on longboards. It’s very common for most eskate brands to develop a longboard, slap on the same components on a shorter deck, and call it a day. But, not anymore. The Wowgo Mini 2 shortboard just changed the game.

Just look back on Meepo Mini 1 and Wowgo Mini. Don’t we all agree on how uninspired they look? Thankfully, this all changed when the late Boosted made the positively received Boosted Mini, and everyone else followed the craze of making better electric shortboards.

Late 2021, Wowgo finally joined the “make shortboard great” movement as they replaced their pathetic-looking Wowgo Mini with the Wowgo Mini 2—a $559.99 electric shortboard that rocks a 10s2p 187.6Wh battery.

Based on its look, it’s pretty obvious right from the get-go that this is not an assembled-from-spared-parts board. 

As per usual, let’s go through the parts and specs.

Build and specs

  • Deck: Canadian maple, U-shaped concave with kick tail
  • Weight: 15.32 lb / 6.5 kg
  • ESC: Hobbywing ESC 4-speed modes with smart power-on
  • Battery: 187.2 Wh – 10s2p
  • Marketed range: 15 miles / 25 km
  • Motors: hub motors 680 W * 2
  • Marketed top speed: 25 mph / 40 km/h
  • Wheels: 90mm street / 105 Cloudwheel Donuts

First, let’s look at this deck.

The Wowgo Mini 2 went with a deck with U-shape concave, following a pursuit on the popular Boosted Mini. Unlike Boosted Mini or Exway Wave though, the concave is more subtle on this one. 

An aggressive concave would have given the board a more responsive feel but may place some discomfort on our feet. I think most people would find this concave in their sweet spot as it still feels responsive, allowing a comfortable feet placement.

To check out our review on Exway Wave, click here.

Functional kicktail with deck guard

The board obviously has a functional kicktail that sure is useful to those who know how to kick turns. It also has a deck guard under it to help protect the tail. If you want to look cool when braking, you can use the kicktail to brake instead of the remote. 

Shortboard polish looks premium

Beneath the deck, we have a single enclosure that houses both the ESC and battery. It appears that Wowgo put in a good effort in designing this mini-board. Unlike the first generation Wowgo Mini which was just assembled from off-the-shelf parts, the Mini 2 looks and feels premium. You can tell that they thought about the design thoroughly. The details on top of the deck are sick! Underneath the deck, you’ll find a very nice gloss finish. 

Perfectly smooth ride with Hobbywing ESC

Now, it’s time to look at the electronics! 

Wowgo Mini 2 uses Hobbywing ESC with 4-speed modes and smart power-on. For the battery, it uses 10s2p 5.0 Amp-hours with 180 Watt-hours. The board’s marketed range is 15 miles or 25 km. We had a 95kg or 209lbs rider test it out and the result is 11 miles or 18km in range. This is no surprise for a 5AH battery. 

You can also check the battery charge level underneath the deck, which might be helpful when you want to check the battery level when charging.

This battery powers a pair of 680W hub motors which are pre-installed with 90mm street wheels. Wowgo Mini 2 is also compatible with 105mm Cloudwheel Donuts. The package included stickers for the hub wheels as well, and a lot more stickers with other designs. We suggest you should just forget about it, as it easily comes off the wheel and is not worth the hassle. 

The marketed top speed is a standard 25 mph or 40 km/h, which we can hit with no problem.

To check out our review on Cloudwheel Donuts, click here.

Well balanced 45-degree trucks at stock settings

Wowgo Mini 2 shortboard

The trucks are Wowgo’s proprietary 45-degree trucks with double barrel bushings. 45-degree trucks are what most eskate brands go with, as it balances between stability and responsiveness. These are not the same trucks as the Poseidon truck found on Wowgo 2s Pro. Let’s see what it can do later.

Now, to summarize the specs.

On paper, the numbers on Wowgo Mini 2 are the same with most sub-$500 boards from affordable brands. For Wowgo, the slightly higher price is certainly justifiable considering the design and polish. Wowgo also used good quality skate parts, which brings us to the review of the riding experience. 

So, how well does the Wowgo Mini 2 ride? Well, we are pretty surprised at how nice the Wowgo Mini 2’s performance is.

Riding experience

First things first, let’s talk about the trucks. It felt really responsive, allowing the board to feel nimble on the feet, and they did this without sacrificing stability. We’re pretty surprised that Wowgo’s proprietary truck performs this well.

To put the truck performance into context:

If you compare Wowgo Mini 2 to Tynee Board Mini and Meepo Mini 2, Tynee Mini and Meepo Mini 2 did not feel nimble and were less fun to carve around. If you compare it to Exway Wave’s Trist trucks on stock settings, Wowgo Mini 2 is more stable.

I always believe that most people get a shortboard for a quick and easy commute on the sidewalk, in college compounds, and a maneuverable board is extra helpful in tight quarters. Obviously, the kicktail is useful for that purpose, too. 

Fun to ride with great control and maneuverability

Wowgo Mini 2 is exactly what you want from a shortboard. It is very FUN to ride on smooth roads. Riding it for the first time, I was very shocked. 

As we have mentioned, the trucks felt responsive, and the board felt nimble but stable. 

And the Hobbywing ESC on this one? The speed controls were super smooth and intuitive, unsurprisingly. What’s rather surprising is that the acceleration is pretty darn strong, too— you might even mistake it for a 12s set-up. 

Braking is also smooth and very strong. The kicktail is very functional and easy to use, too. The subtle U-concave of the deck helped with the controls while being subtle enough for you to not notice the shape all the time.

So, great speed control and great maneuverability—those are the strengths. Now, let’s talk about the weakness.

Weak at handling road vibrations

Actually, there is just one weakness. 

Wowgo Mini 2 is terrible at handling road vibration which shouldn’t come as a surprise. After all, a shortboard with a stiff deck combined with hub motors is a recipe for a very uncomfortable ride on very rough or poorly paved roads. For most shortboards, you will be standing directly on top of the trucks, and all the vibration from the road goes straight up.

From the road > to the trucks > and to your knees. 

The great news here is that you can easily swap to the 105mm Cloudwheel Donuts and greatly decrease road vibrations. But honestly, you should probably consider getting a belt-driven longboard with a flexible deck and big or even all-terrain wheels if you deal with rough roads regularly.

THE VERDICT

Wowgo Mini 2 Shortboard

So, to summarize.

For $559.99, Wowgo Mini 2 gives you a comfortable and nimble ride. The 25mph top speed and the 11 miles range are nothing extraordinary, but the polished build and riding experience more than made up for it. The obvious weakness for Wowgo Mini 2 is the poor comfort riding on rough roads. However, this is an inherent problem faced by all hub-shortboards, and the Mini 2 fares arguably better for having the 105mm Cloudwheel Donuts option available.  

All things considered, it is very easy for us to recommend Wowgo Mini 2 for anyone that’s looking for a shortboard to use on good roads. It is the best shortboard to get for those who want something more refined than the entry-level $400 like the Meepo Mini 2, and don’t want to pay extra for the $749 Exway Wave for all its fancy lights and removable battery.

I think anyone who is in the market for an electric shortboard should first consider the Wowgo Mini 2, as it’s substantially better than its cheaper competitor while simultaneously not too far behind its pricier counterparts. 

Great job, Wowgo. Love this one.

RIDE SAFE, GUYS.

If you are interested in buying the Maxfind, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ” to receive 5% off during check out.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and help us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

Enskate R3 Mini Review – Wrong number but nice to meet you.

Introduction

Do you know what people say about Enskate? They don’t. Enskate is not a brand that usually comes to mind when it comes to Eskate companies. We know they are a good sport though, even after we made fun of their Enskate Woboard S in our previous review, they still came back for more and we respect that. They also addressed some of the complaints that we had with the Woboard S, by upgrading its ESC to a standard Hobbywing, and using a better, non-sex-toy-looking, standard Bobbywing remote.

This time, they want us to test out the Enskate R3 Mini, a practical portable, well-polished shortboard that’s intended for sidewalk commute. And here we are, trying to answer 2 questions with this review:

  1. Is R3 Mini amongst the top choices for sidewalk commute and
  2. is it time for everyone to start paying attention to Enskate?

Enskate R3 Mini Review

As usual, lets run through the specs real quick.

  • Top Speed: 20mph/35kmh ( Our test: 23mph/38kmh )
  • Range: 12.5miles/20km ( Our test: 6miles/9.5km)
  • Battery Pack: 2.5AH pack from Samsung in 10s1p configuration
  • Weight: 13lbs/6.0kg
  • Features: 450w dual hub motors, Hobbywing ESC remote controller,wide concaved deck, big and functional kick tail
  • Price: 399 USD

Riding Experience

i. Acceleration & Breaking

The board has pretty smooth acceleration and braking as expected from hobbywing ESC. Acceleration felt quite powerful and strong. This came as a small surprise as this, after all, is a 10s1p board, performance is not supposed to be its strong suit. Enskate did put a stronger than average 450W hubs on it, so I guess that explains why.

ii. Stability and Maneuverability

R3 Mini has a kicktail that’s useful for sharp turns in tight space and dodging pedestrians, however beginners should pay extra attention when accelerating as it might resulted in an accidental manual and fall on their back. Honestly, same can be said about most shortboard with kicktails, always gotta be careful about them if you are not use to it.

iii. Vibration

The R3 Mini performs great on smooth roads. It has wide concaved deck that makes riding felt stable. It is very nimble and responsive as well. Carving with it is very enjoyable and fun.

But as always for a mini board, when it come to rough roads, the board will suffer. The combination of stiff and short deck make the road vibration felt intense.

iv. Range & Top Speed

I bet you notice something doesn’t add up here. Unless Enskate has it’s battery magic imbued, there is no way that a 10s1p 90wh get us to 12.5 miles or 20km in range.

Our range test gave us 6miles (9.5km) Riding fast on mode 2 and 3 which is expected from a small battery. On the 5.5miles (9km) mark, the voltage sag is noticeable as it starts to slow down significantly.

In other words, Enskate didn’t break the law of physics, but it might’ve broken the heart of some buyers who actually believes 12.5 miles (20km) is possible. Unless, you weigh 88lbs (40kg) and you ride conservatively, there is no way you will get 12.5 miles (20km) with it.

Our tested top speed however is slightly higher than the marketed top speed. During our test, we get 23mph (38kmh). The R3 Mini is pretty stable at high speed but still for a mini-board, 23mph (38kmh) felt faster than usual.

A closer look at the parts

i. Deck

The deck is 8 layers maple with close to zero flex. It has a very wide concave which makes riding feels very comfortable. It has a functional kicktail that is wide making it easy to kick turn.

ii. Components

The board uses a standard 90mm 78A wheels.

There is not much to say about the 90mm 78A wheels that Enskate uses other than there isn’t much to say about them.

Let’s just say, they are good wheels but they aren’t Orangatangs.

iii. Truck

Generic trucks that are nimble and responsive enough

iv. Remote

The R3 Mini uses generic Hobbywing and it came with the first-gen Hobbywing remote that has no telemetry screen.

For two of you who are not familiar with Hobbywing remote, this remote is comfortable in hand, it has no drop connection, and it fits pretty comfortably in the pockets.

Verdict

So, what is our final verdict on the Enskate R3 Mini?

I hope that by this point it’s plenty obvious that the R3 Mini isn’t made for punishing terrain or group rides. It’s made for a very specific purpose, last mile commutes on a sidewalk. So, is it good for that? Yes. It’s a polished short board that rides comfortably and isn’t a chore to lug around.

Is it the best campus board for $399? It really depends on your situation, other budget shortboards like the Meepo Mini 2 are every bit as good and have 2 times the battery size, but like Uncle Ben says, with great power comes… greater weight. There is a reason we DIY-ed a 10s1p crappy shortboard after all.

If you are interested in buying an Enskate, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and uses code: “ESKATEHQ” during check out.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and helps us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

Maxfind Max 2 Pro Dual Review- A good looking board for campus use?

Introduction

To catch up to the rest of the market, Maxfind has released 5 new electric skateboards in relatively short order. We’ve looked at the Maxfind Max 4 Pro, and today, we are looking to review the Maxfind Max 2 Pro Dual – a $569 shortboard.

You never get to make a first impression twice, and the Max 2 pro gets its first impression right.You can see right away how Maxfind puts a lot of effort into making sure the board looks good and feels premium at the same time.

  • Size: 31-inch short board
  • Top Speed: 25mph/40kmh
  • Range: 15miles/25km ( Our test: 12.5miles/20km)
  • Battery Pack: 4.4AH pack in 10s2p configuration, Samsung 22P cells
  • Weight: 14lbs/6.5kg
  • Features: 600w hub motors, 90mm wheels, Hobbywing ESC remote controller,sleek design, polished, and waterproofing
  • Price: 569 USD

Unboxing

Riding Experience

i. Acceleration & Breaking

Despite being a 31-inch short board, it still packs strong performance to rival any regular size electric skateboard out there. The acceleration and breaking is quite nice. You probably will not notice much difference except for the size.

ii. Stability and Maneuverability

The lack of concavity on the deck didn’t help either, as the deck is super flat, so it’s hard to know where my feet are. I needed to check and re-check my feet placement quite often, just to be sure that I didn’t slip off the board.

iii. Vibration

Not surprisingly, you might not be too pleased with the Max 2 pro if you are riding away from its natural habitat into someplace with a rougher surface. As expected, the combo of a stiff plastic deck and hub motors means intense road vibrations. It was so bad that I felt like I was going to skid when turning on bad roads.

iv. Range & Top Speed

The marketed range is 15 miles or 25 km, but during our range test riding at medium to high speed, we got 12.5 miles or 20km, which is still quite impressive.

The top speed is a typical 25 mph (or 40 km/h), but for a mini-board, that’s super fast!

A closer look at the parts

i. Deck

The most noticeable aspect of the board is the short deck with a very nice bottom design. Most electric skateboards tend to focus primarily on the specs alone, but this time they did an astonishing job of balancing between looks and performance. Just look at this sick diamond cutting design! It’s flashy and premium at the same time.

This is not what you usually expect from an electric skateboard. This board looks extremely nice and feels well-polished. It may look like any regular board when you are on it, but when you’re carrying this board around, you will definitely see the true beauty of it.

ii. Components

By the way, did you notice that the Max 2 Pro has no functional kick-tail? If you are new to eskates and wouldn’t know how to use a kicktail anyways, this is great as it maximizes the wheelbase and stability. However, this is also a ballsy choice as it’s going to be a deal-breaker for many skaters living out there.

iii. Wheels

It uses 90 mm wheels, which are standard for many of today’s eskates.

iv. Trucks

Maxfind’s uses non-branded proprietary trucks that are both stable and agile enough to do the job.

v. Remote

The speed control is perfectly smooth, as can be expected from a Hobbywing ESC. I’m going to guess that the max 2 Pro is using the stock version of the Hobbywing ESC, with its typical 3-speed modes; but unlike the weak brakes that come with typical Hobbywing ESC, the braking on the Max 2 Pro is pretty strong – probably due to the stronger 600W hubs that Maxfind is using. For reference, a normal entry-level board has a hub motor of around 500W.

Verdict

When it comes to shortboard for last-mile commuting, we are now spoiled with choices. For those who make purchasing decisions based solely on price vs specs, the Maxfind Max 2 Pro will not be on the top of the list as it’s a $569 board with $400 specs. With the Max 2 Pro, you are paying a premium for the sleek design, the polish, and waterproofing. I think a good head to head comparison might be with the $599 Backfire Mini which is another premium, nimble, powerful shortboard with similar price and specs, plus easy battery access, but minus waterproofing.

In short, the Maxfind Max 2 Pro is a good board, as long as you know what you are paying for.

If you are interested in buying a Maxfind, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ” during check out.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and helps us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

Exway Wave Review – Bye Mini

Follow the discussion on Reddit here

Forward

I’ve written about many Exway boards in the past. In fact, I’ve just written about the Exway Flex, which you can find here, and I have also written previous reviews of the X1 and X1 Pro. By this point, my general impressions of Exway boards are basically the same, so it’ll be useless for me to keep rehashing the same thing.

I do have a few things I do want to talk about though, so let’s run through them.

Boardiness

If you haven’t guessed from the pictures and title, yes this is a shortboard, and that means several things. If you’re thinking about buying this board, you already know about the tradeoffs inherent to a shortboard.

The ridefeel will be way different than a longboard. Due to the differences in wheelbase and deck construction compared to a longboard, the Wave feels very direct and nimble. The deck has a nice bowl shaped concave that really keeps you locked in and help your feet place properly, and the kicktail is just long enough to be useful while not getting in the way. The Trist trucks really come alive with the new shortened wheelbase, and I had no problems feeling confident on the thing.

Due to the increased squirreliness of the Wave, Exway has limited the top speed to around 22mph. I personally think that’s plenty fast on a shortboard. Again, you’re really not buying this thing to go racing. Power delivery remains the same as other Exway boards; that is to say it’s smooth and handles just fine.

Swappability and Battery

Exway has done quite a few innovations here I think. It’s apparent they’ve thought about how everything goes together.

The elephant in the room is the swappable battery pack design. Exway has gone for a slide and click design for their 10S2P Sony VTC6 “smart” battery packs. The main concern with swappable packs in general is and has always been the latching mechanism. You either go too risky (see Mellow’s battery pack falling out debacle) or too annoying (Ride Unlimited’s design that requires screws). I think Exway has hit upon a fairly good mechanism here. Depressing the (very firm) latch allows the battery to slide out sideways along a rail instead of the same direction as gravity and vibration. The battery connectors themselves are recessed and fit tightly when pressed together. There’s a hidden USB charge port that’s usable when the battery is off the board. Exway has also promised a flight ready 10S1P pack variant. Overall I’m liking this setup.

Range testing the Wave produces fairly favorable results. Of course we know that manufacturer range estimates aren’t going to be what you get on a day to day basis, but I got around 7.5 miles (12 km) of hard riding (full throttle, hard takeoffs and brakes) in a hilly area weighing around 125lb (57kg), so I think if you’re just cruising in a flatter area 10 miles (16 km) or so is not an unrealistic figure to expect. It goes without saying that the test was performed will all settings turned all the way up. This makes it the longest range shortboard I’ve tested.

Amenities

The Wave has a surprising amount of amenities for a shortboard. Exway has seen fit to add an integrated RGB tail light standard. This will be a big plus for night riders. By default the tail light comes on red when braking and show increasingly rainbow patterns when accelerating, but you can also adjust light patterns in the app to have it be uh, more tame, or turn it off completely if you’re a boring Debbie Downer.

What’s more, Exway has taken a page out of Boosted’s Mini X playbook by using a semi-transparent tail puck so the tail light can shine through and light it up. The effect is pretty striking and you won’t be out $230 just for some tail lights and a transparent tail puck.

Exway also included a front light on the review units, but the front light is a $30 add-on regularly. It’s a shame it isn’t a standard add-on, it would have really completed the whole look I think. The front light is fairly bright and similarly integrated, with a double click on the remote to turn it on and off. Both the front and tail light intensities can be adjusted in the Exway app as well.

Of course, the Wave has the other usual Exway amenities as well. Remote on/off, smart battery preservation, cushioned griptape, etc. As with the Flex, Exway has chosen not to use the magnetic charge port that’s present (and seemingly becoming a bigger pain than it’s worth) on the X1 and X1 Pro.

Riding The Wave

The Wave is a good board. As a person who doesn’t normally ride or enjoy shortboards, I have to say I’m pretty happy with it. With the Wave, I think Exway has hit two out of three major market segments. They have a general consumer board in the Flex and a short range travel-able board with the Wave. It remains to be seen how the all terrain board pans out, but I have no doubt they’ll succeed with that one as well.

Indeed, what worries me isn’t Exway’s technology prowess. It’s their logistical prowess and customer support. Over the last few months, I’ve seen Exway struggle to deliver the Flex to consumers. Only now, two months since the projected ship date, are delivery reports starting to trickle in. I’d love to see Exway step up their delivery game with the Wave deliveries and communicate more with customers moving forward.

Anyways, pending delivery, I wholeheartedly recommend the Wave for shortboard enthusiasts. Of course, I’d like to spend more time with the Wave, but so far so good.

If you are interested in buying an Exway, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and uses code: “ESKATEHQ” during check out.
It will help you get a small monetary discount (-$20) and helps us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!