Tynee Mini 3 SL review – $359 !! Literally the most affordable electric skateboard.

The Tynee Mini 3 SL is outrageous.

In the electric skateboard world, brands have two tried and true methods to make their product successful. Make a board unique, or sell it at a really, really low price. Tynee with the Tynee Mini 3 Pro managed to stand out in the shortboard niche for its outrageously high torque and power, and now, with the Tynee Mini 3 SL, it will try to do the latter, be the lowest price electric shortboard, period. 

Click to read our review of the Tynee Mini 3 Pro.

Just a little context: Since 2018, an entry-level electric skateboard has had a $400 price tag. Then the price crept up to $450, with increased quality, of course. However, last year, 2023, we started seeing brands offering their entry line-up at $399, which this $359 Tynee Mini 3SL one-upped.

The price war is real, and we consumers love it. The best part is the boards aren’t shabby either. Take a look at the specs.

Tynee Mini 3 SL Specs:

Price$359.00​​ (216Wh)$399.00 (281Wh)
Battery10S3P 6Ah 216Wh10S3P 7.8Ah 281Wh
Controller12s Hobbywing ESC
Top Speed30 mph/48 kph
Range17 miles/ 27 km (216Wh)
20 miles/ 32 km (281Wh)
Deck8 Ply Canadian Maple 
Motor2*550W hub motors
Net Weight8.4 kg / 18.5 lbs

Deck – 8 Ply Canadian Maple

Starting with the deck, the Mini SL is made with an 8-ply Canadian maple and is unsurprisingly similar to the Tynee Mini 3 but with a longer kicktail. Its wide concave makes it pleasant to stand on.

The deck uses the same U-shaped concave design popularized by the late-boost Mini. Compared to other models like the Boosted Mini or Exway Wave, the Tynee Mini 3 SL has a wider concave.

ESC and Remote – Hobbywing ESC

Next, moving onto the ESC, Tynee went with the tried and true Hobbywing ESC, which comes with four-speed settings. And like all Hobbywing ESCs, it has a smart turn-on feature, meaning the board powers on automatically when the remote is turned on. It’s paired with the standard Hobbywing remote and a mobile app where you can customize the ride profile. 

Battery – 6Ah 216Wh battery or 7.8Ah 281Wh:

As for the battery, the Mini 3 SL comes with a 6Ah 216Wh battery or a larger 7.8Ah 281Wh battery for an extra $40.

The Mini SL Hub has a marketed range of 17 miles or 27 km using the standard 6AH battery and 20 miles or 32 km with the larger 7.8AH battery. Our unit was the smaller 216Wh version, and in our range test, we only managed to reach 11 miles or 18km with a 154 lbs or 70 kg rider riding fast. This is slightly lesser than the marketed range, as is always the case when we try to push the speed, but even then, 10 miles and 18km is what we were expecting from a $400 board, so we aren’t disappointed here.

In the worst-case scenario, it is a hub board so you can kick-push if you run a full 20 miles. 

Motor – Dual 550W Hub Motors:

The Tynee Mini 3 SL, uses a dual hub motor drive at 550W max power, which is marketed with a top speed of 30 mph ( 48 kph), which is also impressive at that price point. When we took it to the road, we managed to hit 28 mph (45kph), just a hair shy of the marketed top speed. 

Truck and Wheels – Tynee diamond truck 7” 43° RKP:

For the trucks, Tynee uses their Tynee PE truck, which is short of Paris Electric trucks. These were made by Tynee and were said to be designed based on Paris Trucks. Since we reviewed the other Tynee, we are familiar with Tynee PE trucks and know they are decent trucks, but unlike Paris Trucks, which were known for their responsiveness, Tynee’s trucks were designed with stability in mind.

As for the wheels, the Mini 3 SL comes with standard 90mm street wheels. 90mm wheels are pretty standard for electric skateboards; however, if you usually ride on rougher pavement, you might want to spend an extra $80 for the 105mm Donut wheels for a smoother ride.

Specs Summary of the Tynee Mini 3 SL:

As you can see, Tynee Mini 3 SL’s specs are also pretty solid. Much like the Tynee Ultra SL Hub, the range and top speed are both pretty good and is on par with boards that cost $100 more. Besides putting up decent numbers, Tynee spared no expense on the other parts either, going with the industry-standard Hobbywing ESC and a decent pair of trucks.

In short, this board, at least on paper, is a good deal for the price it’s asking. Now, it just needs to be a good ride to complete the package, and that’s what we’ll discuss next.

Riding Experience on the Tynee Mini 3 SL:

All things considered, the Tynee Mini 3 SL is a smooth, comfortable board, a good board for beginners.

First, let’s talk about speed control. To cut costs, a budget board will occasionally go with an older generation LingYi ESC that wasn’t the smoothest in speed control. And no, I am not calling out Exway Ripple or Meepo V3s here. Those two still use the latest generation of LingYi ESC, which is actually good. I am referring to those no-name brands from Amazon. 

Click to read our review of the Exway Ripple.

Click to read our review of the Meepo V3s.

I am glad that Tynee didn’t do that. Tynee Mini 3 SL sticks with the tried and true Hobbywing ESC, which should come as no surprise that the controls are buttery smooth thanks to the trusty Hobbywing ESC. For those who are new to electric skateboarding, Hobbywing ESC always gives very intuitive speed control, and both the acceleration and braking ramps smoothly without any unexpected jolts.

This also means that the Tynee Mini 3 SL is the opposite of a ‘thrilling board.’ The acceleration curves weren’t aggressive enough to give you an adrenaline rush, and the power of the motors wasn’t strong enough to scare you either. If you were hoping that the board might be top of its class for its torque, just like how the Tynee Mini 3 Pro was, then you will be disappointed.

It does have enough power for a mini-board to get an average-weight rider uphill, but that’s just about it. 

The board was clearly designed to be comfortable, not thrilling, and the other thing that helped it to be a comfortable ride was its trucks. As we mentioned in the introduction, the Tynee PE trucks are pretty good trucks that lean toward stability. Going fast on this small board isn’t scary, thanks to both these stable trucks and also the smooth speed control. 

Turning obviously is easy; this is a shortboard, after all. The kicktail on the Tynee Mini 3 SL is also somewhat longer than average, longer than the Tynee Mini 3 and 3 Pro, for instance. Clearly, Tynee expects you to use kick turn more. We also like shortboards with good concave; it just makes the board more responsive to control and allows us to better gauge where our feet are.

So far, we like how Tynee put the Mini 3 SL together; all parts were designed with comfort in mind, except one thing: the hub motors. Hub motors are more battery efficient, quiet, require less maintenance, are more cost-effective, and free rolls better; hence can be kick pushed, They are also “very good” at passing road vibration to your knee. Shortboards with hub motors are especially uncomfortable on rough roads, and also, they also make annoying sounds on rough roads, which is, annoying. 

This gets better if you pay that extra $80 to upgrade to the 105mm wheels, but if you’re just planning on cruising smooth pavements, you should be good to go. 

Verdict:

With a price tag of $400, we typically look for flaws rather than hoping for a board with a big upside. And the Tynee Mini 3 SL is indeed that, a board that’s overall decent and without major flaws.

The slight disappointment here would be that the bigger 10s3p battery didn’t result in a significantly better real-world range but instead ended up only marginally outperforming its $359 price tag. 

With that said, we still find that Tynee Mini 3 SL offers excellent value for money. It is a very easy ride and put together well. You can do much worse for $400, and Tynee Mini 3 SL is amongst the boards that give you the best bang for your buck.

If you are interested in buying the Tynee, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ” to receive $5 off during checkout.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and help us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

Tynee Ultra SL Hub Review – The best $400 eskate, period.

Tynee just released a Student Life series, a pair of affordable electric skateboards, including the longboard Tynee Ultra SL and a mini-board Tynee Mini 3 SL. 

Today, we will be reviewing the Tynee Ultra SL, a hub-driven electric longboard priced at $399, making it among the most affordable electric longboards out there. Competition in the under $500 affordable category is pretty stiff right now, with both Meepo and Wowgo having a few really good boards at this price, so let’s see how well the Tynee Ultra SL fares against them.

Tynee Ultra SL Hub Specifications:

Price$399
Battery12S 50.4V 6Ah 259.2WH battery
Controller12s Hobbywing ESC
Top Speed28 mph (45 kph)
Range20 miles (32 km)
Deck8 Ply Canadian Maple 
Motor2*550W hub motors
Net Weight8.3 kg / 18.3 lbs

Deck – 8 Ply Canadian Maple:

Starting with the deck, the Ultra SL is made with an 8-ply Canadian maple with a wide concave that’s comfortable to stand on. It has a good amount of flex, which we generally prefer over stiff decks, especially when it comes to hub-driven electric skateboards. The grip tape design is nothing special. As is often the case, Tynee likes to play it simple with a minimalistic monochrome print. 

It’s also pretty nice of them to include a nose and tail protector on each end.

ESC and Remote – 12s Hobbywing ESC:

Moving onto the ESC, Tynee went with the tried and true Hobbywing ESC, which comes with four-speed settings. And like all Hobbywing ESCs, it has a smart turn-on feature, meaning the board powers on automatically when the remote is turned on. It’s paired with the standard Hobbywing remote, and there’s also a mobile app that allows you to customize the ride profile. 

Battery – 12s 50.4v 6ah 259.2wh Battery:

As for the battery, the Ultra SL Hub is equipped with a 12S 50.4V 6Ah 259.2WH battery and has a marketed range of 20 miles (32 km). And in our range test, we managed to cover 11 miles (17km) with a 154 lbs (70 kg) rider riding fast. As is usually the case with the marketed range, you’d need to ride conservatively at a slower pace if you really need to get to the marketed 20-mile range in a single charge.

Although this wasn’t an amazing range, it is on par with what we expected out of a $400 board. For context, the 10-mile (18-km) tested range is what is considered standard from boards from the affordable categories.

And when worse comes to worse, it is a hub board, so you can kick-push if you completely run out of juice. 

Motor – Dual 550w Hub Motors:

The Tynee Ultra SL uses a pair of 550W hub motors, which are marketed with a top speed of 28 mph (45 kph). This is also above average at this price point. When we took it to the road, we actually managed to reach THE 28 mph (45kph) threshold, so it didn’t underperform here.

Truck And Wheels – 7” 43° Reverse Kingpin Trucks And 90mm Street Wheels:

Speaking of trucks, Tynee uses their 7” 43° Reverse kingpin trucks. We are familiar with Tynee PE trucks from reviewing the other Tynee, and we know it is a decent truck that is geared more toward stability.

As for the wheels, the Ultra SL comes with standard 90mm street wheels, providing a smooth ride on various terrains. However, for riders who frequently encounter rough roads, you might want to pay that extra $109 for the 105mm Donut wheels. 


Specs Summary:

As you can see, for less than $400, Tynee Ultra SL Hub has pretty good specs. 

It’s not every day you can find a 12s board for that price. The range and top speed are both pretty impressive and could easily compete with boards that cost $100 more. The bigger battery and big motors are great, but Tynee didn’t skimp on the other parts either, going with the tried and true Hobbywing ESC and a decent pair of trucks.

In short, the board is above-average in value if judged solely by the numbers and the part used. So far, we see no shortcuts taken.

Riding Experience:

Overall, the Tynee Ultra SL is an easy board to ride. It is a comfortable board to ride in all but one aspect.

First, let’s talk about speed control. The acceleration and braking are both super smooth. This should come as no surprise, as you probably already know how Hobbywing ESC consistently gives the board a buttery smooth, intuitive control.

The trucks also contribute to this smoothness. Tynee’s PE trucks strike a pretty good balance between stability and responsiveness. They’re responsive and fun for carving but are undoubtedly geared more towards stability. Testing top speed on these trucks is pretty easy for us, as they remain stable all the way without speed wobbles.

The flexibility of the deck adds a bit to the ride’s smoothness, too. A flexible deck always feels more fun to carve on for us and also helps dampen road vibrations. We hate flat decks. Although this deck doesn’t have an aggressive concave, it has just enough for us.

There’s only one feature of the Tynee Ultra SL that detracts from ride comfort: the hub motors. As with all hub motor boards, riding on rough roads produces annoying noises, and road vibrations are still fairly strong despite the deck’s flexibility. It’s not the worst board in this sense, but it is a problem nonetheless.

These 550W hubs, however, do their job well. They might not have as much torque as a belt-driven board, such as the Wowgo 3E, but they’re certainly powerful enough to get you up any hills. The 12s battery also gives the board an extra edge in power over other 10s hubs, such as the Wowgo 2s max.

Verdict:

Without a doubt, the Tynee Ultra SL really stands out in the $400 board category, thanks to its 12s battery. But while its 12s2p battery is bigger than what you’ll find in most rivals, it doesn’t really add much to the range. Instead, it’s the power where this board really gains an edge.

Now, I’ve got to say, Tynee might have done a bit of a disservice by labeling this as just a student or beginner board. Sure, it’s an easy ride – super comfortable and incredibly smooth – which makes it a great fit for beginners. But, even seasoned eskaters would probably love how they can just turn off their brain and comfortably cruise at top speed on this board.

In short – good value, comfortable ride, Tynee Ultra SL is one of the better budget electric skateboards on the market right now.

If you are interested in buying the Tynee, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ” to receive $5 off during checkout.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and help us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

Tynee Stinger Review – Cruiser with the Best Specs!

After reviewing the Meepo Flow, we re-discovered how well a cruiser deck works on electric skateboards. It’s the perfect size for cruising around. Compared to full-size longboards, they are easier to turn with their relatively shorter wheelbase, and when compared to shortboards, they are much more comfortable for longer rides and have lesser road vibration on rougher roads.  

I guess many brands noticed the same thing, and this year, we see quite a few cruisers released by different brands.

Introducing the $889 Tynee Stinger, another 34-inch board with Double kingpin trucks.

Tynee Stinger Specifications:

Price$899
Battery12S3P, Molicel P42A, 544.32 Wh
Controller12s Hobbywing ESC
Top Speed34mph (55kph​)
Range24 miles(38 km​)
Deck33.86-inch Canadian Maple+fibreglass
MotorDual 3000W belt-drive motors​ , 6368 
Net Weight26 lbs / 11.8 Kg

Deck: 8 ply Canadian Maple and Fibreglass

Starting off with the deck, the Tynee Stinger has a 33.8-inch deck made from 8 layers of maple and fibreglass. It’s pretty stiff with not much flex to it but a nice wide concave and unique deck shape. We really appreciate eskate brands trying out different variations of deck design, and the Stinger is a great example of this by having a lower fishtail dip at the end. It’s ideal for foot placement, and the easier, sharper turns are made possible by the lower centre of gravity, which is practically parallel to the battery level.

In contrast to the sophisticated deck, the belly of the deck is decorated with a clean and minimalistic design with its shock-absorbing grip tape in a simple black and grey colorway. Also, there are wheel wells to prevent wheel bites.

Truck and Wheels: DKP Trucks and 105mm Hydro Wheels

Moving on to the trucks, it seems that every cruiser board uses Double Kingpin trucks, and the Tynee Stinger is no exception.

We don’t recall testing a Tynee with a double kingpin truck in the past, so we are interested to see how it performs.

Next, While we aren’t familiar with Tynee’s double kingpin trucks, we do know these 105mm HydroWheels from our review of the Tynee Mini 3 Pro, which is a super fun and powerful shortboard, by the way. These hydro wheels are a lot different than the cloud wheels, as they’re made out of material somewhere between rubber and PU. It also has tire treads on them which improves its traction on wet roads much better than traditional PU wheels.

Battery: 12S3P, Molicel P42A, 544.32 Wh

Tynee is known to put in a much bigger battery than its rivals, and the Tynee Stinger is no exception. With 12S3P, Molicel P42A, 544.32 Wh, the battery on the Stinger is 30% bigger than the similarly priced Meepo Flow using the same cells.  It is marketed to have a range of 24 miles (38 km), however we were able to travel 22 miles (35 km) when riding fast with a rider weighing 154 pounds (70 kg). Kudos to Tynee for keeping it real with the marketed range.

To read our review on Meepo Flow click here

ESC: 12s Hobbywing ESC

As usual, Tynee opted for the tried and true Hobbywing ESC, which comes with four-speed settings. And like all Hobbywing ESCs, it has a smart turn-on feature, meaning the board powers on automatically when the remote is powered on. It’s paired with the standard Hobbywing remote, but there’s also a mobile app so you can customise the ride profile.

Motor:  Dual 3000W belt-drive motors​ , 6368

Moving onto the motors, the Tynee Stinger packs a punch with its hefty Dual 3000W belt-drive motors​ , 6368, which is way bigger than the already crazily powerful pairs on the Tynee Mini 3 Pro, which are Dual 2775W 6355 belt motors. We’re expecting a heck of a ton of power from these huge motors as their marketed top speed is a whopping 34mph or 55 kph​. We tested it ourselves but bailed at 29 mph or 47 km/h as it gets scary, but the board clearly has more speed to spare.

Specs summary of Tynee Stinger:

To sum it up, the Tynee Stinger has a lot of substance despite its simplistic design. For $889, it packs a lot of battery, has powerful motors, and the 105mm wheels aren’t cheap either. All of this serves to highlight how the Tynee Stinger certainly has a lot of value on paper; all that is left to do is to hit the road and test if the ride lives up to the expectation. 

Riding Experience

Stepping on the Tynee Stinger, we immediately noticed something we don’t quite like about it, which is that it’s very high off the ground due to the thick risers it uses to prevent wheel bites. And you don’t need me to tell you riding in high heels felt a lot less stable at high speed.

But the Tynee Stinger has the power to go really fast. The 12s Hobbywing ESC gives a smooth and intuitive control as always, but the 4th mode came right off the box, being scarily powerful. Much more exhilarating than the Meepo Flow, which is good news for the adrenaline junkies out there, but for everyone else who prefers a more relaxing cruise, there is always the Mobile app to customise to a tamer ride profile.

Again, the board is really powerful, but the high riding height and double kingpin trucks limit how fast we dare to go. 26 mph or 42 km is the limit for us, and even with full safety gear, we only dare to go 29 mph or 47 km/h before it starts to wobble.

While stability wasn’t its strongest suit, the board was undoubtedly built with carving in mind. For the Tynee Stinger, carving is really smooth; words may fail us here, but it feels like drifting when you turn, but in a good way. The turning radius is obviously small, thanks to the short wheelbase and double kingpin trucks.

We can definitely make sharp turns without doing kick turns, which is kinda important because the kick tail is pretty far behind where our rear foot naturally positions, so using it doesn’t come as naturally. Kick turns also were not as easy due to the board’s weight, as those big batteries are heavy.

While we blame the big 105mm hydro wheels for forcing the use of tall risers, they do have their perks. Firstly, though not as well as the Cloud Wheels or the 105 Boosted OEM wheels used on the Meepo Flow, the hydro wheels did decently well in reducing road vibrations, but it did make the board tolerable enough on rough roads.

Secondly is its grip. The hydro wheels are pretty grippy, and that helps make carving fun while preventing the board from drifting.

Verdict – Tynee Stinger:

Unlike many boards nowadays that keep it safe and can be pretty bland, Tynee Stinger is an interesting cruiser board that has clear strengths and weaknesses. 

It is super-duper-powerful and has a great range, and it’s super responsive, too. However, it is also less relaxing to ride due to its higher riding height. Tynee Stinger may not be the best choice if all you want is a comfortable ride to cruise around in. 

On the other hand, Tynee Stinger is an excellent choice if you are a heavy rider who needs the power or you actually need a cruiser board with a great range. Or, if you want a fun ride, the Tynee Stinger’s incredibly strong, nimble, and responsive ride will suit you just fine.

If you are interested in buying the Tynee be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ23” to receive $5 off during checkout.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and help us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!