Exway Flex ER Review— No more range anxiety!

Remember back in the day when Boosted ruled the market and established how flexible decks are equal to smooth rides? Alas, Boosted is no more but many brands are still trying to carry the legacy. 

Exway, a brand known for delivering amazing post-sale service (much like the late-Boosted), almost came close to reviving Boosted with the Exway Flex. The board has a nice flexible deck, silky smooth control, and polished build. This is the Boosted experience at just a fraction of the price, and we loved it very much.

The Exway Flex still had room for improvement, though. Like the Boosted, its kryptonite is the mediocre specs — especially in the range department.

So after a few years, Exway finally decided to jack up the Flex and fix the range with a 345 Wh battery. This new $800 board, ‘creatively’ named Exway Flex ER, does have some other improvements besides a battery boost. Let’s see if these are worth flexing by diving right into specs.

Exway Flex ER Build and Specs

  • Deck: Wide flexible composite deck made of maple, fiberglass, and bamboo; less concave and flare 
  • Electronic Speed Controller: 12s Hobbywing ESC; 4-speed modes, smart turn-on, in-app customization feature
  • Battery: 21700 4000 mAh 3.6 V high discharge li-ion cells; 12S2P; 345 Wh
  • Marketed Range: Hub – 28 miles or 45 km; Belt – 27 miles or 43 km
  • Motors: Hub – 5230; Belt – 4230
  • Marketed Top Speed: Hub and Belt – 28 mph or 45 kp/h
  • Trucks: Proprietary Trist Truck 8” Reverse Kingpin
  • Wheels: 85*56mm 76A 

As usual let’s start with the highlight of the board — the deck itself. The deck is still the same composite deck made up of maple, fiberglass, and bamboo. This gives the board a super flexible vibe with a few tweaks on the board’s concave. 

Exway reduced the deck’s concavity to make it flatter, wider, and less flared. The original deck was pretty aggressive, and we think this tuned-down version will be more widely accepted. Anyhow, we certainly love this new deck for ‘all its curves and all its flexes’, as it makes a smooth and stable ride.

We also noticed there’s a slight change on the grip tape of the deck. The deck now sports a new design that exposes the bolts underneath. This makes it easier for the users to add or remove extra accessories to the board without damaging the grip tape. Exway is known for creating thoughtful design choices like these.

The orange wheels and deck also makes the board look more and more like the traditional Boosted. Exway is bringing nostalgia while still mixing their brand’s personality in it. Overall, the Exway Flex ER feels more polished and refined than the original one. 

Hobbywing ESC In-app Customization Feature 

Exway Flex ER

As for the ESC, Exway uses a customized 12s Hobbywing with 4-speed modes, a smart power-on, and in-app customization feature. Inside the app, you can change your preference and adjust the acceleration and braking strength of the board. 

Moving on to the motors, a hub and belt version is available. Exway designed the board in a way that allows easy switching between the two systems. There is little reason to buy both systems, but the option to change your mind regarding the drivetrain is obviously a very welcome one. 

Marketed Top Speed Achieved

Exway Flex ER

In this review, we tested the hub version of the Flex ER. This board uses dual 1000W hub motors marketed to have a top speed of 45km/h or 28mph. We are happy to report that we managed to hit the top speed claim during our test!

The board also comes with standard 85mm Urethane wheels which aren’t particularly interesting but are still a good pair of high quality and rebound wheels. 

The trucks are still Exway’s Proprietary Trist Trucks. We are quite familiar with it as Exway has put them on most of their boards. These are reverse kingpin trucks that span 8 inches in length, and we consider them one of the really good trucks in terms of responsiveness and stability. 

If you want to see the Trist Trucks in action with shortie Exway Wave, click here.

60% Increase in Battery 

Now, let’s head into the biggest upgrade of the board which is the battery. The Flex ER has received a huge 60% bump in battery size over the previous model and is now equipped with a 345Wh battery as compared to 216Wh on the previous one. 

This is a massive step up over the old one. Exway also marketed it to have a 45km or 28miles range as compared to 17miles or 27 km on the old one. 

These are huge claims by Exway, so we just had to test the limits ourselves. We pushed the board to its maximum capabilities and ran it fast through hilly areas. Our 150 lbs or 70 kg rider managed to hit 22 miles or 36 km on the Flex ER which is impressive. 

If the board was ridden on a flat road most of the time, we’re pretty confident we can hit at least 25 miles or 40 km of range without a problem.

Fast Charger Right Off The Box

Another thing we highly appreciate from Exway Flex ER is the free fast charger right off the box. Not every brand includes that by default. 

The Flex ER also comes with a bash guard pre-installed, which keeps the edge of the deck safe and secure right from the factory. The board is rated as lp55 water resistant and weighs in at 8.3kg or 18 lbs.

That’s a wrap in terms of specs and build quality! Let’s see how all of those translate into the riding experience.

To check out our OG Exway Flex review, click here.

Exway Flex ER Riding Experience

Like all Exway boards, the acceleration of the Flex ER is very smooth. The customized Hobbywing ESC is proven to be super smooth with plenty of power. Bear in mind that we are testing a hub version of the Flex ER. Torque and power aren’t usually the strength of a hub system, and Exway addressed that by going with a pair of big 1000w motors. 

For context, most really strong hub boards use 500w motors. While wattage alone doesn’t tell a full story, it does show Exway is putting some emphasis here. The torque and power will become even stronger if swapped to the belt version.

Keeping the Old Flex-y Deck

Next, let’s talk about the ride feel. Even if the concavity of the deck was toned down a little, it is still significant and did a good job securing our feet. 

We hear a lot from the eskate community that the original Flex has a profound concave they call “flare.” This flare makes people with bigger feet feel uncomfortable. Though, we did not experience that since we only wear US-size 10 shoes. This update will be much appreciated by the bigger riders out there. 

While toning down the decks concave may split the room, the flexibility of the deck is universally loved. The Flex ER is still as flexible as the old Flex with its good old smoothness and fun carving.

Of course, the Trist trucks play a big part in delivering a fun carving experience, too! Turning and maneuvering with the board felt effortless. The truck also had a good return to the center. 

Right out of the box, the trucks are a bit loose. If you want more stability at high speed, we recommend you tighten the trucks a little bit. After adjusting the trucks by a few turns, the board should handle its high speeds. Although this is never the board’s specialty, you would want a board with a stiffer deck, and a truck that leans toward stability if high speed riding is your thing.

As we are testing the hub version of the board, we did feel the strong vibration when we hit rough roads and terrains. Nevertheless, the flexy deck did help a little bit in terms of absorbing those road vibrations. 

We recommend upgrading to 105mm Cloudwheel Donuts if you are living in an area that has poor road conditions. Otherwise, the riding experience is very very fun on smooth roads.

To learn more about Cloudwheel Donuts, click here.

Voltage Sag Is No Longer A Problem

The Exway Flex ER Hub isn’t exactly a beast when it comes to power but it does maintain good torque even when running low on battery. Compared to the original Flex, the voltage sag is no longer a problem. With 15 % battery left, we still managed to climb a  pretty steep hill our old Flex cannot handle.

Exway Flex ER Final Verdict

Exway Flex ER

To summarize, for $800, Exway Flex ER gave a polished riding experience on top of the polished look. Its flexible deck, carvy trucks, and silky smooth control make it an amazing board that is a pleasure to ride. The same profile also means that the board is not meant for drag races and high speed. Bouncy decks and twisty trucks don’t exactly spell “stability at high speed.”

While the specs and battery size are usually the weak links of Exway boards, the Flex ER proves to be an exception. A range of 28 very enjoyable miles for $800 is great, if not amazing. It is worth noting that going with the belt version means you will lose quite a bit of range, but again, 345Wh will still get you very far. 

On that note, for anyone unsure about going belt or hub, it is always wise to choose the belt version for smoother rides and better torque. Only go with hub motors if you want to be stealthy with maximum range, or if you absolutely hate belt changes. 

So, should you buy Exway Flex ER? Well, it certainly sets a standard for a board at $800. Considering there aren’t many boards that price around $800 at least just yet, the question perhaps should be, why shouldn’t you?

If you are interested in buying Exway, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ” to receive $15 off during checkout.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and help us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

Wowgo AT2 Plus Review – Cheaper than Exway Atlas and Meepo Hurricane, but better?

When Wowgo launched the old AT2 in 2020, we knew right away that it was going to be popular. At $1099, the board wears the Evolve formula very well (Evolve formula: flexible drop deck + 7-inch pneumatic wheels that could be converted into street wheels + Double Kingpin Trucks—a recipe for a really smooth ride).

This year, Wowgo is giving us the AT2 Plus. It’s a sequel to the AT2 that came just at the right time. The competition shouts “stiff” with boards like Exway Atlas and Meepo Hurricane. The Wowgo AT2 Plus is definitely meant to challenge Meepo and Exway. 

Wowgo AT2 Plus

Compared to the Meepo Hurricane and Exway Atlas which are priced at around $1599, Wowgo AT2 Plus is selling at just $1229 for the all-terrain version and $1349 for the 2-in-1 package which includes 120mm Cloudwheels. Pretty cheap in comparison, eh? 

So, is being one of the most affordable 2-in-1 boards the only thing the Wowgo AT2 Plus is good for? Or will the board outperform the pricier duo? Let’s find out in this Wowgo AT2 Plus review!

Wowgo AT2 Plus Build and Specs

  • Deck: double drop with subtle wide concave; fiberglass, bamboo, and Canadian maple
  • Electronic Speed Controller: 12s Hobbywing ESC
  • Motors: 2100W belt motors
  • Marketed top speed: 31 mph / 50 kp/h
  • Batteries: 43.2 V, 14 Ah, 604 Wh, 12S4P configuration
  • Marketed range: 18 miles or 30 km 
  • Trucks: 12-inch Front and Rear Double Kingpin Truck
  • Wheels: 2 in 1 (175 mm Pneumatic Wheels + 120 mm CloudWheels)

Wowgo AT2 Plus uses a double drop deck made of fiberglass, bamboo, and Canadian maple. It has a subtle wide concave that doesn’t feel significant but has a nice flex to it.

This time around, Wowgo gave the board a fresh grip tape design which we really like. It looks pretty futuristic! 

Beneath the deck, we have a flexible enclosure that contains a 12s4p 604 Wh battery pack made out of Panasonic cells. Although it’s an upgrade from the previous 10s4p 504Wh pack on the AT2, this battery configuration offers the same modest marketed range of 18 miles or 30 km when using the AT wheels and 27 miles or 45 km on the Cloudwheels configuration. 

Our 155 lbs or 70kg test rider put the numbers to the test and got 14 miles or 23 km out of the AT setup. The test ride is pretty aggressive and pushes for top speed multiple times. We believe that with Cloudwheels, you can get up to 25 miles or 40 km of range without a problem.

To read our Wowgo AT2 review, click here.

Upgrades on ESC, motors, wheels, and rear lights?!

Wowgo didn’t stop the upgrades there and improved the electronic speed controller as well. The Wowgo AT2 Plus uses a 12s Hobbywing ESC coming from the 10s Hobbywing ESC on the AT2. The remote remains the same with a smart turn-on feature, and acceleration and braking are still super smooth.

The trucks on Wowgo AT2 Plus use 12-inch Double Kingpin Trucks for easier turning and maneuverability. It comes in 175mm pneumatic wheels by default but you can purchase the 2-in-1 version to get the 120 mm Cloudwheels. 

Powering these wheels is a set of 2100W belt motors which are again, an upgrade to the previous 1500W motors on the AT2.

These new motors increase the top speed of the Wowgo AT2 Plus to 31mph or 50km/h after doing some tweaking to the board… We’ll share this tweak with you in a bit!

The board weighs around 30 lbs or 13.6 kg and it comes with rear lights which are pretty nice. The automatic on and off feature is an awesome bonus that night riders will surely enjoy.

As you can see, the Wowgo AT2 Plus specs got a little bit of boost, not to mention a nice design update. The board looks well built and polished but how does everything perform on the streets? Well, it’s time to ride!

Want to learn more about Cloudwheels for your electric skateboard? Click here.

Wowgo AT2 Plus Ride Experience

Hopping onto the board, we can instantly tell that Wowgo is going for a buttery smooth setup. The acceleration is the smoothest that we’ve tried on any eskate. You can fully hit the throttle without getting thrown off the board. 

Braking is also very smooth and safe for beginners. You can engage full braking without falling out of balance. Advanced riders will wish it had more punch to it, though. The braking on Meepo Hurricane and Atlas 4WD is still stronger at stopping very quickly.

When it comes to power, the board is deceptively powerful. It is much stronger than the old Wowgo AT2 and can handle any incline with ease. The acceleration ramps up so smoothly, that you can ride fast with comfort. Make no mistake though, the AT2 Plus still can’t compete with the likes of Meepo Hurricane in a drag race but the power is more than enough for riding in the meanest streets.

Interested in Meepo Hurricane, click here to learn more.

Secret tweak for stability at top speed

Wowgo AT2 Plus

Next, let’s talk about maneuvering and as it turns out, it’s quite difficult to explain.

You see, the prototype of the AT2 Plus came out to have very loose trucks and soft 90a bushing. This initial setting felt nice to carve around but you really need to be mindful of the limitations. You can unintentionally slide if you aren’t careful.

It’s easy to turn and carve in this configuration, especially for beginners. This stock setting, after all, makes the Wowgo AT2 one of the smoothest boards amongst all AT boards. However, the trade-off comes in the form of speed wobbles, which will be there even at moderate speed. 

Alas, after some deliberation, Wowgo decided to replace the soft 90a bushings with something much harder and ended up with 95a bushings on the front and 97a bushings on the back. 

When we tried this new configuration, the strengths and weaknesses flipped. The board is super stable now with no problem pushing up to 31 mph but the board is no longer easy to turn for us. 

With all that said, we are 150 lbs Asians. So, if you weigh 180 lbs, this new set-up might just be right for you. Otherwise, you might need to take matters into your own hands and experiment with more bushing yourself. Luckily, changing the bushings is neither difficult nor pricey.

Choose your preferred wheels for a different feel

Now, let’s talk about ride comfort. The flexible deck and 175 mm wheels ride smoothly even in harsh road conditions. To put some context, going off-road on the Wowgo AT2 Plus is more comfortable than with the Atlas and Hurricane. The flexible deck acts like a suspension that eases bumpiness from off-road rides.

Swapping to the 120 mm Cloudwheels provides a much different ride feel. Since the board is really low, it almost feels like riding right above the ground thanks to the double-drop deck. This is akin to the feeling of driving a race car, not that we have been in one. 

The lower center of gravity helps the board to be insanely stable at high speed. However, be careful when you pass speed bumps as the board will often bottom out and get scratches. Or, you can just get used to it like we do… like our poor Meepo Hurricane…

It’s worth noting that you will have to pay an extra $120 for the Cloudwheels, and you should probably go with that option. This is not what we normally recommend, as our personal experience suggested that street wheels don’t usually end up getting too much play time in 2-in-1 boards. In the Wowgo AT2 Plus case, however, you might need the street set-up for the range. As our range test shows, the AT2 Plus has a very average range (14 miles, 23 km), and going with a Cloudwheels setup would be the easiest way to extend the range(25 miles or 40 km).

Well, that’s about everything, so let’s tie it all up. 

The VERDICT – one of the best affordable 2-in-1 boards

Wowgo AT2 Plus

Wowgo AT2 Plus is a pretty board with all the right ingredients. While the balance between stability and easy turning might require some extra tinkering on your part, and the range is merely average, Wowgo AT2 Plus is built well with good power and great ride comfort.  

Is it a better performing board over Meepo Hurricane and Exway Atlas?

Of course not, the other two clearly out-specced the Wowgo AT2 Plus.

However, being $300 cheaper is not nothing either, and there’s no reason to pay for extra range or power that you won’t need. With all things considered, we think Wowgo AT2 Plus is, at the end of the day, one of the best affordable 2-in-1 boards available right now.

If you are interested in buying the Wowgo, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ” to receive a small discount during check out.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and help us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

Meepo Shuffle S (Meepo V4S) Review – Best affordable Electric Skateboard? Maybe.

Meepo board is the OG in bringing us affordable options for electric skateboards and since 2017, it has been amongst the top choices for those who are looking for affordable electric skateboards. While their current best seller, Meepo V4 (Shuffle) was just released 10 months ago, Meepo decided to give us an update with the V4s (Shuffle S)… So, let’s see what the updates are, and if it gives Meepo further lead over other boards under $500.

Let’s get right through it!

Meepo Shuffle S (V4S) Build and Specs

  • Deck: 8-ply Canadian maple, 1-ply fiberglass; wide concave with a rocker profile
  • Electronic Speed Controller: LingYi ESC, push-to-start; 4 speed and braking modes
  • Motors: 540W hub motors
  • Marketed top speed: 29 mph (47 km/h)
  • Batteries: 4AH 144Wh or 288Wh 
  • Marketed range: 10 miles (16km) or 18 miles (29km)
  • Trucks: Meepo’s 45° Shredder trucks
  • Wheels: 105*65mm, 78A donut wheels

The deck of the Meepo Shuffle S is made of 8-ply Canadian maple and 1-ply fiberglass. We can expect a mild flex to it but it compensates with a pretty deep and aggressive concave design. This helps in securing leg placement for great balance during a ride.

The deck also has a slight rocker profile which we’re a fan of. This form made the Meepo V4S feel closer to the ground. 

Elegant Upgrade on Design

The upgrade of the board is focused on the design. From an orange toy-ish looking color scheme on the Meepo V4, The Meepo Shuffle S (V4S) took a more elegant approach, which we like better, especially on the graphics beneath the deck. 

As for the electronic speed controller, the V4S uses the latest Lingyi ESC with a push-to-start feature. It has 4 speed and braking modes which can be adjusted separately. It does provide a smooth acceleration to the board, but is it as smooth as a Hobbywing ESC? We’ll talk about that later on. 

Lower Rating of Motors and Bigger Wheels?

Another change Meepo did on the Shuffle S is using a lower rating for the motors. The Meepo Shuffle S uses dual 540W hub motors which might come as a surprise to Meepo V4 fans. The previous V4 uses dual 620W hub motors and Meepo claims that it’s a necessary sacrifice to allow using big 105mm donut wheels. I guess we will have to find out if going with a smaller wattage motor has any negative impact on torque and speed.

These are clones of the famous Cloudwheels which significantly reduce road vibrations. Will it have any effect on the power, though? We’ll find out later on.

The marketed top speed for the Meepo Shuffle S is 28.5mph or 46km/h. During our test, we managed to reach 28mph or 45km/h. This is a praiseworthy feat for a budget board.

What’s here to stay are the 45° Shredder Downhill Trucks. These trucks are known to be stable rather than carv-y. 

To check out our review on Meepo V4 for comparison, click here.

Two Options for Batteries

So, did Meepo change anything for the batteries? The Meepo V4S is keeping the same two options for batteries: a normal 4AH 144Wh battery with a marketed range of 10 miles or 16km and an extended range version of 288Wh battery with a marketed range of 18 miles or 29km. 

We received the basic version of the board, and our heavyweight 95kg rider managed to reach a maximum distance of 6 miles or 10km out of the 10 miles or 16km marketed range. It is nowhere near the marketed range but as usual, weight and speed play a huge factor in achieving the maximum possible range of a board. 

Meepo also admits that using 105 mm wheels will sacrifice the range by a bit and they insist that everyone should get the ER version for more range.

On the bright side, the battery is fast charging. You can reach a full charge in just 30 minutes by purchasing a separate 8A fast charger for the board.

Now that we know all about the specs of the Meepo V4S, let’s talk about everything in action!

Meepo Shuffle S (V4S) Riding Experience

From the get-go, the Meepo V4S is a budget board on steroids! Riding around the V4S is super strong. So I guess, it does live up to the well-known Meepo reputation of delivering a bit of punch when it comes to acceleration and braking. 

The controls are still smooth and are not entirely aggressive but beginners should be careful when riding the board for the first time. The board can catch you off guard with its punchy acceleration. With that said, this new Ling Yi ESC did a good job at delivering a smooth ride with the board but it still falls a bit behind the Wowgo 2S Max’s silky smooth 12S Hobbywing ESC. 

Interested in Wowgo 2S Max? Click here.

Overkill Acceleration Power

Once you get used to it, we are pretty sure that a lot of riders out there would appreciate the punchiness of this board. It turns out that the drop in motor wattage number doesn’t really affect the actual performance that much, since the V4 already has a pretty overkill acceleration power.

The deck is without a doubt the charming point of the V4S. It is nice to stand on with the lower ride height. The board’s concave is also very easy to feel while riding and secures your feet at all speed modes. The board is not flexible during rides, which highlights stability when riding at higher speeds. 

The 105 mm Donut Wheels definitely did their job at absorbing road vibrations, especially on rough roads. But as we all know, hub motors are still hub motors and when the roads get shittier, you would still feel the vibrations traveling through your spine.

To check out our review on Cloudwheel Donuts, click here.

Shredder Trucks Are Geared Towards Stability

As always, Meepo’s 45° Shredder trucks are biased towards stability, while 50° trucks, such as the Poseidon trucks on the Wowgo 2s Max, would be more carv-y than stable.

With that said, it’s a nice pair of trucks. While the Shredder trucks do not rise to the level of branded trucks such as the Caliber II or Paris, they are definitely just as good as the other proprietary trucks found among affordable eskates. The trucks are decent for carving, have a good return to the center, and are absolutely stable to ride at top speed.

Big 105mm Wheels to the Rescue!

It has to be said that, Meepo’s 105mm semi-AT wheels are not Cloudwheels, and is not as good as the genuine Cloudwheels when it comes to ride smoothness.

However, at the end of the day, every millimeter helps when it comes to reducing road vibration. These 105mm wheels do make a huge difference, when compared to a 90mm (such as the one on original V4), when riding on bad roads.

Making 105mm a default wheel size is especially helpful for eskate beginners or commuters, who above all else, value “not flying off the board for failing to dodge a stick.” 

Meepo Shuffle S VERDICT – Punchy Acceleration and Braking!

So, here comes the verdict. For a board retailing at 500 USD and is now priced lower at 419 USD with Meepo’s current sale, the V4S is a good board with a pretty great design and polish. The addition of 105 mm Wheels would probably split the crowd. For some, it sacrifices range and reduces carving fun; for others, especially beginners, it makes the board much more usable, comfortable and safe.Well, at least you can always shell out more and go with the ER version if range is a concern.

At the end of the day, Meepo V4s is still one of the top choices for an affordable $419 and THE CHOICE for anyone looking for a sub $500 board with big wheels, or a budget board with strong torque.  

If you are interested in buying the Meepoboard, be sure to use our affiliate link here.
It will help us out and you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

Tynee Mini 2 Review – Champion of All Mini Boards?!

Everyone appreciates a healthy bit of rivalry between tech companies. When these companies compete with each other by making a better product, the side that benefits the most is us consumers.

A classic example of this in the e-skate industry would be the rivalry between Tynee Mini and Exway Wave. That’s why when Tynee announced the release of their mini-board’s newest version, we just can’t wait to get our hands on it. Here’s our Tynee Mini 2 review!

Tynee Mini 2 Build and Specs

  • Electronic Speed Controller: 12s Hobbywing ESC
  • Deck: genuine Canadian maple, wide concave with kicktail
  • Battery: Molicel 6.0 AH 216 Wh or Molicel 10.1 AH 363 Wh
  • Marketed Range: 14 miles or 22 km; 25 miles or 40km
  • Motors: 2x550W hub motors or 2x850W belt-driven motors
  • Marketed Top Speed: 30 miles or 48 km per hour
  • Trucks: Tynee PE upgraded on Paris V3, 7 inches, 43°
  • Wheels: 90 mm PU wheels or 105 mm Cloudwheels

On paper, the Tynee Mini 2 is impressive. The mini board uses a deck made of genuine Canadian maple with a concave similar to the previous Mini model, Boosted Mini, and Meepo Mini 2. 

During our test, the wide concave of the board greatly helped riders experience a stable and comfortable ride. The leg placement on the deck is very natural and secure. Slipping won’t be an issue. The Tynee Mini 2’s deck is also stiff and does not have any flex to it just like all mini boards in the market. 

As for the electronic speed controller, the Mini 2 uses a 12s Hobbywing ESC with 4-speed modes and a smart power-on feature. For those who don’t know yet, Hobbywing ESC is the gold standard for a buttery smooth and precise board control. 

Two options of Molicel batteries for power

Now, let’s move on to the board’s power source. There are two options available for the Mini 2. The first is the Molicel 6.0 AH 216 Wh battery with a marketed range of 14 miles or 22 km. For more range, there’s an option of a Molicel 10.1 AH 363 Wh battery with a marketed range of 25 miles or 40km.

We got the second version, and the range test only hit 12.4 miles or 20 km with our 216 lbs or 98 kg rider at speed mode 4. For most viewers out there weighing around 154 lbs or 70 kg, you can expect 22 miles or 35 km of range at speed mode 4.

While the Tynee Mini 2 didn’t reach the marketed range in our test, it is important to note that this board uses Molicel which is one of the best cells for electric skateboards. Tynee Mini 2 sells at 629 USD for the smaller battery version, and 769 USD for the bigger one.

This gives the Tynee Mini 2 a huge advantage over the Exway Wave Riot which only has a marketed range of 12.4 miles or 20 km on the standard battery. Although, keep in mind that the Wave Riot’s battery can be easily swapped out to keep the board nimble and sleek.

To read our Exway Wave Review, click here.

Hub and belt-driven motors

The Tynee Mini 2 gives two options for the motors as well. You can either opt for the 2x550W hub motors or the 2x850W belt-driven motors which is the one we used for our test rides. 

We highly recommend the 2x850W belt-driven motor version if comfort is a priority on your checklist. These motors are paired with stock 90 mm wheels with a marketed speed of 30 miles or 48 km per hour. 

For a mini-board, this is a bit overkill but those who love to go fast certainly wouldn’t mind. In our test, the rider did manage to get a top speed of 28 miles or 45 km per hour. Pushing it to the max speed can be a bit risky, though.

Tynee PE trucks are here to stay

Tynee Mini 2 PE Trucks

As for the trucks, Tynee Mini 2 keeps its proprietary Reverse KingPin trucks from the previous model which are based on the upgraded Paris V3. After seeing these trucks on three different models, we can safely say that these are geared towards stability but at the same time can carve pretty well. 

Finally, the new board comes with built-in brake lights and a kick tail for kick turns.”. It’s also nice that the Tynee Mini 2 has an IPX6 water-resistant rating but as we all know, we shouldn’t trust that too much. 

To read our Tynee Board Classic Review, click here.

Tynee Mini 2 Riding Experience

Tynee Mini 2 Kicktail

Now that we’ve covered the specs and numbers, it’s time to ride!

The headliner for the Tynee Mini 2 is definitely its acceleration. For a lot of people, whenever a mini-board is mentioned, speed and acceleration are rarely the biggest concern. Mini boards are, well, mini, and aren’t designed for high speed.

The deciding factor for most people is its portability and how easy it is to travel or commute with these mini boards. However, Tynee is breaking this tradition and mindset with the Tynee Mini 2. The acceleration on this board is buttery smooth and intuitive thanks to the 12s Hobbywing ESC and the belt-driven system. 

Ridiculous top speed for a mini board

The ridiculous marketed max speed of 30 miles or 48km per hour breaks the norm that a mini-board shouldn’t go fast. Testing it out went pretty well due to its power, concave maple deck, and longer wheelbase. This build formula is able to handle things well at higher speeds. 

Tynee Mini 2 is stable at 22 miles or 35 km per hour and if you’re feeling a little brave, you can go for 28 miles or 45 km per hour. 

Well, the speed and acceleration are highly appreciated and very welcome, since the Tynee Mini 2 is equipped with a powerful and smooth braking system.

To read our Tynee Board Ultra Review, click here.

Tynee PE trucks are geared towards stability

The carving experience on the Mini 2 is also decent as it feels fun to carve but falls behind the Trist Trucks of Exway Wave, a board that’s more nimble and agile. 

While the Mini 2 does have a kicktail, it does not live up to its full potential due to the heavy battery at the bottom part of the deck. These made the kicktail dependent on strength but if you give it some practice, you can make it work. 

Another thing that the Tynee Mini 2 can work out is the ride experience on rough roads. In general, mini boards are bad for rough roads due to their stiff and short design. Fortunately, Tynee Mini 2 is a little forgiving, thanks to the belt-driven system. You’ll still feel the vibrations, though.

Tynee Mini 2 VERDICT – not so mini in stability and top speed

Tynee Mini 2 is a high-performance mini-board that gives a huge amount of power and range. We are happy that Tynee updated their Mini version for better performance. The price is absolutely reasonable with its killer specs and value. It is, in our opinion, the most powerful mini electric skateboard at this price point. 

Tynee Mini 2 also rides like a champ, breaking the record for the most stable mini-board to ride at high speed. If you compare it to the WowGo Mini 2 and Exway Wave, Tynee Mini 2 is less nimble and carve-y. It is also quite hefty and bulky due to the bigger batteries and its double enclosures.  

All things said, if speed and range are everything to you and are not particularly concerned about premium polish and features, like a swappable battery, then this is definitely the mini-board for you. 

If you are interested in buying the Tynee, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and use code: “ESKATEHQ” to receive 5% off during check out.
It will help you get a small monetary discount and help us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

If you liked this Tynee Mini 2 Review, check out our other articles at Electric Skateboard HQ! RIDE SAFE, GUYS.

Cloudwheels Review – I must break you. Will I?

This content is brought to you by our dear friend from Electric Skateboard Malaysia.

Cloudwheels, are they any good? Do they actually feel like riding on the clouds?

Today we, Electric Skateboard Malaysia, are going to go over the all-new Discovery Cloudwheels, from iWonder, and let you know what we think of them!

We tested the 105mm Cloudwheels on an Exway Riot Flex over the course of about 187 miles, or 300 Kilometres. Since iWonder markets these as ‘All Terrain’ wheels, I tested them on just about every terrain possible. After all that testing, today I’m going to tell you all about the strengths and weaknesses of the Cloudwheels.

Let’s get started!

Discovery Cloudwheels – The Pros and Cons

The Cloudwheels really excel on rough roads. Riding them on those conditions you can feel the difference compared to normal street wheels. They absorb road vibrations very well and had no problem going through cracks and potholes. They call this cushioning effect ‘damping core technology’. I have no idea what that means, but it looks like they put some kind of cushion or foam inside the wheels, to absorb road vibrations.

I would say that they successfully reduce around 60% of road vibrations. But you shouldn’t expect them to be as comfortable as an All-terrain pneumatic tire, those are a night and day difference.

Cloudwheels help to reduce a portion of the road vibrations, making riding on rough roads bearable. Pneumatic wheels, on the other hand, basically cancel out all road vibrations and are way more comfortable.

Testing Various Surfaces

On sand, Cloudwheels just roll and do their job without a problem. They grip more, so they spin well on sand compared to street wheels. But I wouldn’t try to carve on sand, it’s still slippery and you will probably fall down. 

On Grass it will spin well, if your motors have the power and torque to do so.

On small pebbles, the Cloudwheels perform okay. I would not call them comfortable, but it’s not that bad.

On rocks and small stones, it’s a different story.  You’ll end up with a headache because the vibrations are too strong.

It’s just not meant for riding on that type of material. It would be terrible for beginners especially, but I wouldn’t recommend it at all since you could fall down.

So, naming the Cloudwheels ‘all-terrain’ is a bit of an exaggeration. Instead of calling them ‘All Terrain’, I would have called them ‘Hybrid wheels’, meaning that they are between street and all-terrain wheels.

What makes Cloudwheels unique

To understand why Cloudwheels are special, you need to understand the difference between street wheels and all terrain wheels.

Street wheels are fun to ride because they free roll very well without resistance. They give you the most torque and highest top speed. They are also lightweight, so you’ll achieve maximum range, but they suffer on rough roads.

AT, or all terrain wheels, on the other hand, are very comfortable, but they will effectively cut your maximum range in half. If your board is able to go 30 miles (50 km), you’re only going to get about a 15 mile (25 km) range. AT Wheels also grip more, so they free roll less, meaning that they are slow. Another problem is that AT wheels are very large, and can only be used on giant boards, like the Ownboard Bamboo, WowGo at2, and evolve GTR series.

This is where Cloudwheels come in. They sit between street and AT wheels. They are more comfortable than street wheels, but not as comfortable as AT wheels. But the best part is that you can use them on almost all boards that use a belt-drive setup.

They also don’t add much weight, so your range will only be reduced by a small amount.

Here is an example of the Exway Flex Riot. You can see that they can’t use AT wheels because they simply will not fit.

For boards like this, using cloudwheels is the best option if you are looking to reduce road vibrations while riding.

The original cloudwheels that I have were not very durable and chipped easily. However, after testing these I can say that this new version survived my tests.

I tried to destroy them by riding off-road, but surprisingly there was no chipping at all. 187 miles (300km) on rough roads and they still look brand new.

So, are cloudwheels perfect?

The answer is no, and here is a quick list of the small sacrifices that you will have to make.

First, due to the tread pattern on the wheels, Cloudwheels free roll less than street wheels, and because they roll less, you will lose a bit of range

Second, on wet roads, just like any other PU wheels, they are slippery. The best wheels for wet roads are rubber.

Third, you will lose a little bit of torque when you switch from street wheels to cloudwheels. It’s not really noticeable in a daily-use scenario, but it is most noticeable when going uphill.

So, what’s the verdict?

The new Discovery Cloudwheels by iWonder are great, and I consider that the sacrifices are pretty small.

They fit most boards. They Look good. They come in different colors to match your board and enhance the aesthetics.

The Cloudwheels give you a slight increase in top speed, and most importantly they perform great on rough roads, especially on boards that can’t use the full-size all terrain wheels. This is the best choice currently available. They aren’t true all-terrain wheels, but if you are skilled you can make them work.

By the way, the Cloudwheels come in two sizes: 105mm and 120mm. Choose the 105mm for boards like the Exway Flex, Backfire Zealot and WowGo 3x. Pick up the 120mm for big boards like the Evolve GTR.

And if you are from Malaysia, be sure to check out our online store @ https://electricskateboardmalaysia.com/ when you want to grab something! Cheers!

If you are interested in buying a Cloudwheel, be sure to check out our affiliate discount link here and uses code: “ESKATEHQ” during checkout.
It will help you get a small monetary discount ($10 off) and helps us out too. On top of that, you’ll be tagged as an Electric Skateboard HQ customer and probably be treated better. Cheers!

That’s all for this review! If u have any questions, please leave a comment below!